Women who waited 96 years to vote for a woman for President

Photos via I Waited 96 Years: Women Born Before the 19th Amendment Voting for Hillary / Facebook

It's the touching antidote to an endlessly disheartening election.

Ready for a much-needed, feel-good cry after an election that basically reminded us we live in a country that's far from post-sexism? Well, peruse through this website filled with stories of women who have waited nearly a century to vote for a female president. 

I Waited 96 Years! is a touching testament to the long, tough game women have continued to play toward gender equality. The site features women old enough to have lived before the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which granted women the right to vote, but who are "proudly" voting for Hillary Clinton in this election.

Like 98-year-old Lung Hsin Wu, from Portland, Oregon. "My vote means another step towards equity for women!" she says. "I voted for Hillary eight years ago, and I'm still alive to vote again. This time she'll win!"

Screengrab via iwaited96years.com

And 99-year-old former school teacher Sylvia Schulman, who says, "This vote is not just because Hillary is a woman, nor because I am a Democrat. It's to show that we as women can do anything we want, especially when we have worked hard in our careers to obtain the experience necessary to excel."

Screengrab via iwaited96years.com

And former church secretary Alice “Lal” Coxe Keith, from Buffalo, New York, who is "glad my twin sister and I lived long enough to have the privilege of voting for a woman for president.”

Screengrab via ihavewaited96years.com

And let's not forget, 105-year-old Bea Egelman Ide, who started working at age 14 to help pay for her siblings' education—and who, as a former interior designer, might know a thing or two about being a boss in a pantsuit. "I think she will make a good president because she has a lot of experience and knows the workings of the presidency," she says.

Screengrab via iwaited96years.com

You can read more inspiring stories like these at I Waited 96 Years

H/T Vox

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