Taylor Swift’s ‘London Boy’ is a bop, but Brits don’t think her lyrics are accurate

If you’re going to sing a love song to a city, you should get your facts straight.

“London Boy,” a track on Taylor Swift‘s new album Lover, has actual Londoners feeling skeptical about its authenticity. The song, which purports to be about a romance between Swift and an unnamed Brit—likely her current boyfriend, actor Joe Alwyn—seems to get some key facts about The Big Smoke all wrong.

Even if you don’t know much about London, corny lines like, “And now I love high tea, stories from Uni, and the West End / You can find me in the pub, we are watching rugby with his school friends,” hint that the song might not be totally based on real-life experiences.

British Twitter users have been picking apart Swift’s bonafides, and Londoners definitely have their doubts. It appears we might have another “Welcome to New York” on our hands.

There are logistical issues. The travel that Swift maps out in the song would be difficult even for veterans of the London Underground. While they don’t have to deal with the likes of Andrew Cuomo sabotaging their subways, some things are still impossible for a legitimately functioning transit system.

There are other geographical nitpicks as well.

There is even a question of whether or not Taylor knows what goes on in the course of a London afternoon.

And some of her claims were immediately written off as wishful thinking.

Of course, it didn’t take long for people to start cooking up more accurate versions of the song.

And others predicted the inevitable conclusion of yet another Taylor Swift backlash cycle.

Despite its geographical issues and clichés about the city, you have to admit that “London Boy” is a catchy song, and a lot of fans love it.

https://twitter.com/discoqueen168/status/1164807349803995137

You can listen to the full song below:

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Brenden Gallagher

Brenden Gallagher

Brenden Gallagher is a politics reporter and cultural commentator. His work has been published by Motherboard, Complex, and VH1. He’s the co-founder of Beer Money Films, an indie production company. Based in Los Angeles, he works in television drama as a writers assistant.