Ryan Murphy teases new series about #MeToo—and people are skeptical

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There will reportedly be episodes about Harvey Weinstein and Kevin Spacey.

Hollywood can’t stop giving Ryan Murphy TV shows, but his latest project is getting pushback, and for good reason.

In a new interview with The New Yorker‘s Emily Nussbaum, the Glee and American Horror Story creator claims his next project is tentatively titled Consent, and it’s possibly part of the American Crime Story franchise. According to the story, “It would follow a Black Mirror model: every episode would explore a different story, starting with an insidery account of the Weinstein Company. There would be an episode about Kevin Spacey, one about an ambiguous he-said-she-said encounter. Each episode could have a different creator.”

While TV shows and movies have already started being critiqued and headlined for their #MeToo message, the idea that a man would actually create a show around women’s abuse, pain, and trauma was not met with the praise Murphy might have been looking for. People called out his history of using the assault of women as part of the narrative in AHS, and called for women to be involved in the making of the series if it does actually happen.

BuzzFeed writer Alison Willmore tweeted about Murphy’s relationship with the press and response to criticism, and the passive-aggressiveness that seems to be leveled at critics. The New Yorker article described how he approached one critic for her critique of Feud.

Further compounding this potential project is Murphy’s response in the article to allegations close to home. Asked about Ronan Farrow’s December New York Times piece about Harvey Weinstein’s “complicity machine,” which mentioned one of Murphy’s agents, Bryan Lourd, Murphy said, “I’m loyal to my friends” and that he didn’t think one of his agents would have been part of that machine. He also shrugged off the troubles that followed many of his Glee stars: “It’s sad, but it’s also Hollywood.”

Murphy, who more recently created a TV show about 911 calls, is gearing up for Netflix run, so this project could end up there. Murphy’s response to criticism and being “misunderstood” is a bit troubling, but he also backed off a proposed Monica Lewinsky American Crime Story after realizing that she should be the one telling the story. Maybe that will translate here.

Audra Schroeder

Audra Schroeder

Audra Schroeder is the Daily Dot’s senior entertainment writer, and she focuses on streaming, comedy, and music. Her work has previously appeared in the Austin Chronicle, the Dallas Observer, NPR, ESPN, Bitch, and the Village Voice. She is based in Austin, Texas.