PewDiePie’s subscriber battle heats up with cheerleaders doing ‘B*tch Lasagna’ routine

As PewDiePie continues to battle with Indian record label T-Series for the title of most popular YouTube channel, he’s had plenty of people cheering for him. Now, that includes actual cheerleaders.

As noted by Dexerto, cheerleaders for a Lithuanian professional basketball team recently performed to PewDiePie’s viral hit “Bitch Lasagna” and then asked fans to subscribe to his channel.

This was the skit performed by the BC Zalgiris Kaunas cheerleaders during a timeout break.

“Bitch Lasagna”—which has 139 million views in four months on YouTube—was one of the first major attempts PewDiePie made to hold off T-Series from taking his No. 1 spot. Since then, YouTube’s most popular philanthropist MrBeast has made it his personal mission to keep PewDiePie at the top, most recently pulling off a trolling stunt at the Super Bowl.

T-Series actually held the top spot for a few minutes last week, but PewDiePie has since rebounded and now holds a lead of about 70,000—probably based in large part on Elon Musk’s appearance on his meme review show. As of this writing, PewDiePie has more than 87.36 million subscribers, while T-Series boasts 87.29 million.

Meanwhile, in the past several months, PewDiePie fans in India and Bangladesh have tried to convince people to subscribe; YouTube star Justin Roberts reportedly paid $1 million for a PewDiePie-supporting billboard in Times Square; and hackers have infiltrated printers, Chromecasts, and Nest cameras in his name.

At some point, T-Series will probably catch PewDiePie again and maintain its YouTube subscriber lead against the Swedish social media star for good. But PewDiePie and his cohorts have put up an impressive fight, and it’s clear that they’ll continue to keep him No. 1 for as long as possible.

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Josh Katzowitz

Josh Katzowitz

Josh Katzowitz is a staff writer at the Daily Dot specializing in YouTube and boxing. His work has appeared in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and Los Angeles Times. A longtime sports writer, he's covered the NFL for CBSSports.com and boxing for Forbes. His work has been noted twice in the Best American Sports Writing book series.