Professional slapper who was ‘knocked out’ by Logan Paul says it was faked

KENNY K.O./YouTube

Paul is even more enraged.

The professional slapper who was shown being knocked out by Logan Paul has now changed his story. Slap for Cash, whose real name is Rick Royce, said his reaction to the slap that supposedly knocked him into unconsciousness was fake.

He’s also challenged Paul to a real fight in a boxing or MMA ring.

“Y’all seen the recent video where I fell down. What man falls frontward after getting hit?” Royce said on Instagram. “I was OK with helping him get out of the recent Russian slap content. I was all right with even falling on the ground. I’m not all right with how they reacted. I did not call them. They called me to help me out. Hey man, you’re trying to make me look bad. Let’s get in the boxing ring and see what happens. You don’t want to go there. I’ll even go MMA with you.”

https://www.instagram.com/p/By8OHKjhl0i/

Royce said the actual slap was real and that even though Paul hit him as hard as he could and “palmed it,” Royce told the Kenny K.O. YouTube channel, “I’ve taken slaps by bigger and stronger people.”

Here’s what happened when Paul’s palm made contact with Royce’s face in May.

https://twitter.com/LoganPaul/status/1131283702695153664

(For what it’s worth, no matter what Royce said, boxers who are knocked into oblivion by a punch sometimes do fall forward after getting hit. That’s when you know that boxer is truly hurt.)

In the aftermath of the Royce slap, Paul pulled out of a professional slap contest in Russia, later telling Travis Mills’ ADHD podcast on YouTube that “I have never seen a human crumple like that.”

Paul said that afterward, Royce didn’t remember his name or how he’d gotten to Paul’s house for the video.

“I realized I don’t like hitting defenseless humans,” Paul said. “It didn’t give me the feeling I thought it would. I thought I would feel like, ‘Oh competition, I did it.’ But I felt like a fucking dickhead.”

But Royce is now saying he had to fall down after the slap, or he wouldn’t have gotten paid by Paul.

“I knew for a fact he wasn’t going to post this if I made him look bad in any sort of way,” Royce said. “If I didn’t fall down, I knew there was no chance it was going to get posted and I knew there was no chance I was going to get any amount of money from him after the video.”

Unsurprisingly, Paul was livid about the interview.

“This boils my blood,” Paul said in a video posted on Twitter. “He is lying through the skin of his teeth … He changes his story every five minutes.”

Paul said he paid Royce $300 for flights and accommodations, and Royce was supposed to direct Paul on slapping form and technique. Paul said there was no agreement on how Royce would react to the slap and that Royce had already been paid before the slap. Paul said he paid Royce an additional few thousand dollars after the slap because “I felt like I had taken a piece of his brain.”

“The slap doc is not fake,” Paul said. “You did not have to fall down to get paid.”

Paul also said he’s got more video of a disoriented Royce and that he’ll probably make a mini-documentary about the whole incident. He also said he’d be happy to fight Royce in the ring. Considering he doesn’t seem any closer to fighting KSI in a rematch of their YouTube boxing extravaganza from 2018, it seems like Paul’s got the time anyway.

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Josh Katzowitz

Josh Katzowitz

Josh Katzowitz is a staff writer at the Daily Dot specializing in YouTube and boxing. His work has appeared in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and Los Angeles Times. A longtime sports writer, he's covered the NFL for CBSSports.com and boxing for Forbes. His work has been noted twice in the Best American Sports Writing book series.