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Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s disposition at Brett Kavanaugh’s swearing-in becomes a meme

MollyJongFast/Twitter (Fair Use) Remix by Samantha Grasso

The Notorious RBG is at it again.

It’s almost hard to believe that Brett Kavanaugh‘s confirmation to the Supreme Court was only roadblocked for less than a month before the Senate voted to confirm his nomination on Saturday. It feels like Christine Blasey Ford came forward months ago to describe what she characterized as an attempted rape carried out by Kavanaugh and a friend of his, Mark Judge, when they were in high school. The past three weeks have aged us all.

But even though multiple women have come forward to say that Kavanaugh committed acts of sexual impropriety toward them—and his chaotic confirmation hearing ended in an FBI investigation that didn’t include interviews with Kavanaugh or Ford—President Donald Trump‘s swore-in his pick to the court on Monday night.

However, it appears that Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg wasn’t going to let his swearing-in happen without her final dissent. Ginsburg, no stranger to fandom and meme celebrity herself, seems to have become a last act of “resistance” for women on Kavanaugh’s way onto the court, her striking side-eye contrasting deeply from the men seen laughing alongside her.

It seems that others picked up Ginsburg’s disapproving demeanor, too, making her the perfect reactionary meme to the last leg of Kavanaugh’s challenged but fairly protected journey onto the Supreme Court.

https://twitter.com/kevinpokeeffe/status/1049447408709427200

Others thought that RBG could’ve gone so far as to melt Kavanaugh with her glare, bordering on a thousand-yard stare.

And some noted, instead, that Ginsburg didn’t exhibit “much emotion” at the swearing-in. What—did you want her to smile or something?

Kavanaugh might be a Supreme Court justice, but at least the Democrats still have Ginsburg to put up a fight.

Samantha Grasso

Samantha Grasso

Samantha Grasso is an IRL staff writer for the Daily Dot with a reporting emphasis on immigration. Her work has appeared on Los Angeles Magazine, Death And Taxes, Revelist, Texts From Last Night, Austin Monthly, and she has previously contributed to Texas Monthly.