You can now buy medical marijuana for your dog

It’s time to talk about doggie treats of a totally different variety.

In the latest sign that the acceptance of marijuana is marching forward across the country, people are giving their pets marijuana-infused edibles to treat chronic pain and other veterinary conditions that have failed to improve.

These are not your everyday pot brownies; they’re made specifically for dogs and cats with medical issues. The weed-for-people business is already thriving in states that offer some version of legalized marijuana, so it stands to reason that our four-legged friends should be next in line.

“This isn’t about getting my dog high. It’s about improving his quality of life.”

Before jumping to any negative conclusions, remember that not only is this stuff natural and non-toxic, but a 2o13 article in the Journal of the American Veterinary Association interviewed some people who sang veterinary marijuana’s praises.

Now a “true believer” in marijuana’s therapeutic effects for at least some animal ailments, Denise says she will recommend the drug to other pet owners. “People need to understand that this isn’t about getting my dog high,” she said. “It’s about improving his quality of life.” 

Cannabidiol doggie treats from veterinary marijuana company Treatibles.

Cannabidiol doggie treats from veterinary marijuana company Treatibles.

Treatibles

People have eaten weed forever, and now it might just become the new norm to give the potent product to our sick pets. That’s the hope of companies like Treatibles, Canna Companion, and Auntie Dolores. Marijuana is already big business, and pet owners often have no qualms spending lots of money to maximize a pet’s comfort and happiness.

These companies are split in their thinking on whether or not to include psychoactive ingredients in their products. While marijuana’s CBD, or cannbidiol, has great pain-relieving effects, it doesn’t affect one’s perception. But a company called TreatWell is a strong proponent of using the famous (and psychoactive) THC in its pet treats, even if it draws the ire of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

There are not yet any formal medical guidelines for how to treat pets with marijuana. But there are few such guidelines for humans, too—and yet here we are.

H/T Quartz | Illustration by Max Fleishman

Dylan Love

Dylan Love

Dylan Love is an editorial consultant and journalist whose reporting interests include emergent technology, digital media, and Russian language and culture. He is a former staff writer for the Daily Dot, and his work has been published by Business Insider, International Business Times, Men's Journal, and the Next Web.