Photo via Obama White House/Flickr (Public Domain) Remix by Jason Reed

TMZ obtained a video of Malia Obama not wanting her photo taken.

Fame isn’t always a good thing, especially when your father is one of the most popular ex-presidents ever. And even though her dad retired from his day job, fans aren’t letting up on Malia Obama now that she’s starting college at Harvard.

Malia was entering a salad shop at Harvard Square on Saturday when a woman came up to her, asking to take a photo for her granddaughter. Malia politely rejected the request, but the woman was persistent. She waited for Malia to leave to take a photo. And once she left the restaurant and saw the woman waiting, Malia snapped.

“Are you gonna take it in my face like an animal in a cage,” Malia said in a video obtained by TMZ. According to the Independent, Malia Obama eventually gave in and let the woman take her picture.

But it’s pretty invasive to obsess over Malia Obama’s life. When people treat Malia like a reality star, focusing in on every little detail of her life, it robs her of her chance to have a life like any other college student. Many complain that both the photographer’s picture and TMZ’s reporting are feeding into that problem.

In a bipartisan twist, Trump fans and Obama critics even came to Malia’s defense, arguing that she has a right to privacy while going to college.

This isn’t the first time Malia Obama has faced scrutiny from the media. Malia was previously criticized for smoking a “marijuana cigarette,” better known as “pot” by most normal Americans. Harvard students also lost their collective cool when they saw Malia’s famous dad, Barack, helping Malia move in. No matter where Malia Obama goes, the world isn’t ready to treat her like a normal person.

H/T Raw Story

Ana Valens

Ana Valens

Ana Valens is an LGBTQ reporter and essayist for the Daily Dot. Her work has previously appeared in Bitch, the Establishment, Vice's Waypoint, Rolling Stone's Glixel, and the Toast. She lives in Brooklyn, New York.

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