Photo via Gage Skidmore

Americans sharply divided over how Trump will perform as president

Trump has the lowest ratings since 2000.

 

David Gilmour

Tech

Published Dec 15, 2016   Updated May 25, 2021, 9:24 am CDT

Slightly more Americans believe that Donald Trump will be a poor president than believe he will make a good one, according to a new poll.

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The results, published Thursday by CBS News, show that 34 percent of respondents expected that Trump will make a good president compared to 36 percent who expected he’d perform poorly in office.

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The poll’s results are heavily influenced by partisanship. Among Democrats, 60 percent expect Trump to be a poor president, compared to 70 percent of Republicans who think he will performing well.

When compared to the results from the same poll in 2008, following Barack Obama’s election victory, the nation’s expectations are shown to be drastically different. Eight years ago, a staggering 63 percent of Americans conveyed an optimism in the Obama’s abilities—only 7 percent of people believed Obama would make a poor president. Likewise, in 2000, a mere 14 percent of voters believed George W. Bush would perform poorly. As far as this poll goes, Trump is the most poorly rated president in the last 15 years.

According to the poll, the electorate is also split on the president-elect’s cabinet choices, and 60 percent of participants believe that his business relationships represent a conflict of interest. The same number believe that not only should Trump release his tax returns but that he needs to stop using his Twitter so much.

The research interestingly explores attitudes as divided along partisan lines. The results there are as expect. Democrats and Independents tend to have less expectation when it comes to Trump’s capability to run the country and exhibit less faith in his administration.

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See the full results of the poll below: 



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*First Published: Dec 15, 2016, 11:41 am CST