Snap’s Spectacles have a new look and a new price tag

After losing over $40 Million on the first iterations of its smart glasses, Snap has released a third-generation of Spectacles to entice the “fashionable creative[s]”–provided they’re willing to drop $380.

With that increased price comes a second camera that allows depth capture, opening the door for 3D capabilities. Third-party developers will be able to produce software for the glasses in the fall, the Verge reports. A design change was also included in the update, giving the sunglasses a more minimalist, albeit it very, very weird look. Engadget reports that the Spectacles can now record a minute of video, up from the original 10 seconds.

The Verge points out that the price may be out of reach for a majority of Snap’s user base, which is high school to college-age consumers. But Snap said in a statement that the new second camera helps to capture depth and dimension similar to the way human eyes do, as a way to justify the $250 increase in price. This newest edition to the Spectacles line may just be what 3D and AR pros are looking for, but it seems doubtful that college freshman will be as enticed to spend the extra cash.

Spectacles 3 are available in “carbon” black and “mineral,” a gold color. The steel frames have adjustable tips, with indicator lights around the peripheral cameras. The minimal design is arguably fashionable but safely differentiates them from the chunky “everyman’s sunglasses” territory of Spectacles 1 and 2.

Despite Snap’s struggles with Spectacles, the social media giant has managed to cling to success. Last month the company beat Wall Street expectations with its second-quarter earnings report and saw shares jump as a result.

The smart glasses are currently available for preorder on Spectacles.com and will be available for purchase in November.

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H/T: The Verge

Brooke Sjoberg

Brooke Sjoberg

Brooke Sjoberg is an editorial intern for the Daily Dot studying journalism at the University of Texas at Austin. She is also the Daily Texan's Life and Arts Editor and an editorial intern for Texas Connect magazine.