Here’s video of yet another alleged gunman looking for YouTuber Adam22

@adam22/Twitter @KEEMSTAR/Twitter

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For the second time in a week, popular podcaster and YouTuber Adam22 was apparently the target of a man with a gun. This time, the alleged gunman posted a video to Instagram that showed him pointing a weapon at an employee at Adam22’s clothing store in Los Angeles and telling him to get on the ground and “shut the fuck up.”

Then, he instructed the employee to retrieve Adam22—whose real name is Adam Grandmaison—and explained in a frenzied tone that he didn’t want any money. The employee, with his hands raised, walked to the back of the store and closed a door behind him. The man then threw the gun on the ground before appearing to walk out of the store.

As Grandmaison wrote on Twitter, “Some dude just ran up in the store with a gun looking for me. The cops have the whole block closed off with helicopters everywhere. What the fuck.”

According to YouTube gossip vlogger Keemstar, police were called, and the man was taken into custody.

Grandmaison—who has 2.6 million YouTube subscribers—explained on Twitter that the man had previously been in contact, writing, “Why the hell did he film this. dude has DMed me dozens of times trying to ‘collab’ and shit, i guess this was his last ditch effort to get some attention.”

On Sunday night, while Grandmaison was live streaming from his store, a man named David Tran broke in and allegedly attacked the YouTuber while brandishing a gun.

“Give me all your fucking money,” Tran screamed. As they began to struggle with each other, Tran said, “Right now! Do you want to die right now?”

According to TMZ, the 24-year-old Tran has been charged with attempted second-degree robbery.

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Josh Katzowitz

Josh Katzowitz

Josh Katzowitz is a staff writer at the Daily Dot specializing in YouTube and boxing. His work has appeared in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and Los Angeles Times. A longtime sports writer, he's covered the NFL for CBSSports.com and boxing for Forbes. His work has been noted twice in the Best American Sports Writing book series.