Person talking(l+r), Ugg sign(c)

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‘These aren’t really meant to be worn outdoors’: Former shoe store worker exposes what Uggs were really made for

‘I’d rather sell you the Sorels.’

 

Grace Fowler

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Posted on Nov 29, 2023   Updated on Nov 30, 2023, 7:43 am CST

A former shoe store worker posted a viral TikTok explaining the real purpose of Uggs after a girl convinced her dad she could wear them in the snow.

Lex (@a.leg.sis) has reached over 2.1 million views and 348,000 likes on their video as of publication. They say Uggs were made to be slippers, not boots.

At the beginning of the video, Lex explains that they worked in a shoe store about 10 years ago when a young girl, around age 11 or 12, screamed at them from outside the store. “Do you have the short ones?” Lex recounts the girl screaming.

After conversing with the girl for a while, Lex says the girl was arguing that Lex wasn’t showing her the correct “short boots.” 

“As if I’m gonna go in the backroom and like chop the top off for her,” Lex adds. Then, Lex says the girl begins complaining about the price, claiming they’re much cheaper everywhere else.

Nevertheless, the girl leaves, but she comes back a few hours later with her dad.

“She is just as entitled and rude to her dad,” Lex says.

“They go through the whole song and dance of what happens every time someone asks their dad to buy them Ugg boots,” Lex adds. “The dad says, ‘I don’t think they’re waterproof; I don’t think they’re good for ice.'”

Lex says the dad is completely correct, but the girl still tells her dad that all her of friends wear Uggs in the snow.

Eventually, the dad lets the girl try on the shoes and says he will think about it. “So, he asked me if I could get his daughter’s size, and I’m like, ‘Sure!'” Lex says.

Then, Lex explains their thought process when choosing to be honest with the dad or not. “I can either make $7 in commission, or I can be an open and honest salesperson,” Lex says.

Next, Lex says they ask the girl if this is her first pair of Ugg boots, and she says yes. They decide to give her some tips since it’s her first pair.

Lex says the dad begins listening in at this point. “These aren’t really meant to be worn outdoors,” Lex says, “If it’s totally dry and clear out, you should be fine, but you really wanna avoid wearing these in snow, slush, ice, anything like that.” Lex says this is because you will slip, and the ice will seep through to your socks.

@a.leg.sis #retailstories ♬ original sound – lex

At this point, the dad starts to ask questions. 

Lex says they go into the story of how “Ugg were originally designed in Australia, and they were meant to be something warm and cozy to wear, like, after surfing.” 

“They aren’t supposed to be worn in snow and slush, in the elements of a Canadian winter,” Lex adds.

The girl starts to yell at Lex and her dad, saying that Lex is lying and all of her friends are wearing them in the snow. Lex agrees, saying that many people wear them in snow and ice, but “they’re really not meant for that, so I just have to tell you so you don’t hurt yourself.” 

Next, Lex explains that the bottom of Uggs are foam, not rubber, so “it’s basically like trying to walk on snow in a flip-flop.” 

Lex tells the dad they would rather sell him Sorel boots since they are actually waterproof. 

Eventually, Lex says the dad ends up thanking them for their honesty and knowledge and says he will recommend their store to other women he knows. He did not buy the Uggs for his daughter. 

“So, the question is, was it worth it for me to not make $7 so that I could have that experience? Yes,” Lex says before ending the video. 

Viewers in the comments section agree that many people wear Uggs for the wrong reasons. “Uggs are fall shoes not winter shoes,” one comment says. 

“Slipped on ice and broke my hand wearing Uggs. Can confirm they are not good winter boots,” another says. 

The Daily Dot reached out to Lex via TikTok direct message and Ugg via email.

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*First Published: Nov 29, 2023, 6:30 pm CST