The D.C. Metro can’t handle all the people going to the Women’s March

The Women’s March on Washington is underway—that is, if they can get through the D.C. Metro stations first.

Twitter users attending the march have posted photos showing congested areas through the Washington area’s subway stations and trains. It appears to be an amazingly empowering scene with a side of slight inconvenience. 

This echoes the nearly-all Women’s March flights coming into the city on Friday. But airplane cabins lit pink and “nasty women” greetings from flight attendants have been swapped Saturday for longer wait times and packed train cars.

“In general [there are] really packed subways and lots of frustration that they weren’t opening the Metro gates for everyone. But people were shouting and chanting in the stations already,” Daily Dot writer Jaya Saxena reported. Having left for the march at 8am ET, Saxena took 10 minutes to get through the Springfield Metro station and another 20 minutes to get to the march.

But many others have waited much longer.

Aside from the prolonged wait times to get onto the train, reporters following both the inauguration and the Women’s March have noticed the … interesting discrepancy between the Metro volume of the last two days. And the numbers provided by the Washington D.C. area transit authority don’t lie.

As reported by CNN, as of 11am ET on President Donald Trump‘s Inauguration Day, 193,000 trips had been made on the Metro subway system. However, in 2009 by that same hour, 513,000 trips had been taken for President Barack Obama‘s first inauguration. And in 2005, 197,000 trips had been taken for President George W. Bush’s second inauguration.

According to the Metro Authority, Saturday’s ridership as of 11am ET is already at 275,000—what they say is eight times a normal Saturday and busier than most weekdays.

Twitter users and reporters backed up the numbers, too.

(Sorry, this embed was not found.)

Great job, ladies—it’s not even noon and you’re already shuttin’ shit down! Here’s to hoping that your hour-plus-long commute clears up soon, however…

Samantha Grasso

Samantha Grasso

Samantha Grasso is a former IRL staff writer for the Daily Dot with a reporting emphasis on immigration. Her work has appeared on Los Angeles Magazine, Death And Taxes, Revelist, Texts From Last Night, Austin Monthly, and she has previously contributed to Texas Monthly.