What’s cooking on Youtube?

Here we are, in a weird digital age where most of us young folk don’t know how to cook. Thankfully the good citizens of YouTube have stepped in, and in many cases, reinvented the cooking show. Yes, there are plenty of cooking shows on YouTube, but the Daily Dot thought to highlight the more unusual ones. 

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Published Jun 30, 2011   Updated Jun 3, 2021, 4:11 am CDT

Here we are, in a weird digital age where most of us young folk don’t know how to cook. Thankfully the good citizens of YouTube have stepped in, and in many cases, reinvented the cooking show. Yes, there are plenty of cooking shows on YouTube, but the Daily Dot thought to highlight the more unusual ones.

Want to learn how to cook Japanese cuisine? Why not watch “Cooking with Dog”, featuring the dog Francis who narrates beside the shy Japanese woman that actually creates the meal. Cooking With Dog began in September 2007, and has been viewed more than 24 million times. Informative, short, and easy to repeat:

Epic Meal Time is so epic, it’s near bulimia inducing (extreme high calorie meals comprised mainly of meat). Epic Meal Time began cooking in September 2010, and has racked up more than 137 million views on their videos to date. Every episode of Epic Meal Time reminds one of the now defunct “This is Why You’re Fat” website. Check out the ABC News segment on Epic Meal Time, and this Daily Beast piece.

Regular Ordinary Swedish Meal Time features an angry swede with facial hair and his quiet buddies. Food gets thrown around as often as heavy metal guitar rifts. ROSMT joined YouTube in January of 2011 and has received over 18 million views on their videos so far. ROSMT appears to have been inspired by Epic Meal Time, as that is the only channel ROSMT subscribes to.  Dramatic to the point of terrifying hilarity:

Speaking of Heavy Metal chefs, there is the newly created Vegan Black Metal Chef, which has received more than 1 million views on only 2 episodes. Here is the Huffington Post’s take on VBMC, and the Washington Post even took photos. I have to wonder if the lapse since the second video means the fame went to Manowitz’s head.

A more serious cooking show would have to be “Show Me the Curry”, featuring Hetal and Anuja,  two stay-at-home moms from Texas. ABC 7 even interviewed them here. Hetal and Anuja’s videos have been viewed more than 24 million times since joining YouTube in 2007.

My Drunk Kitchen’s shtick is basically that – Harto tries to teach you how to cook and gets drunk in the process. Hannah Hart, who goes by MyHarto on YouTube, joined the site in 2009 and has just over 3 million views, but didn’t post her first video until 3 months ago, the first of which is below. 3 million views in three months is impressive. MyHarto’s videos are more comedic than informative, and some of us at the Daily Dot think she is faking her drunkiness.

And of course, what YouTube cooking show list would be complete without the ubiquitous Great Depression Cooking show.  Featuring 94 year old Clara, the show pitches itself on YouTube with “Learn how to make simple yet delicious dishes while listening to stories from the Great Depression.” Great Depression Cooking became successful enough to spawn a cookbook and a DVD compilation.

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*First Published: Jun 30, 2011, 1:57 am CDT