Police try to solve domestic violence by giving victims blunt kitchen knives

BTW

Police in Nottinghamshire, England, believe they’ve found the solution to domestic violence, British news station ITV reports. The brilliant idea? Replace the kitchen knives in victims’ homes with blunt ones.

The program will provide “no-point” knives to victims who report being threatened or attacked with a knife in their home.

“We are trialing it to see if it makes a difference,” said Nottinghamshire Police Superintendent Matt McFarlane, according to ITV. “Sometimes you have to trial things to see if they work. Anything that stops someone being seriously injured is a good idea.”

But people on Twitter, understandably, do not think it’s a good idea.

While kitchen knives are indeed a potential weapon, so is basically everything else.

https://twitter.com/MummyTBD/status/1138760162381041664

In fact, blunt objects, which include fists, are more likely to be weaponized against victims than kitchen knives. According to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, only 19% of domestic violence involves a weapon at all.

https://twitter.com/EdinburghMayhem/status/1138754911708110849

David Spicer, whose Twitter bio says he’s a psychotherapeutic counselor, points out that there’s no such thing as a blunt knife if you use it with sufficient force.

Others suggested that doing so will cause more damage than if a sharp blade was used to begin with.

It’s also not that hard to find or even make a sharp object if you want one, even if you no longer have knives laying around.

Or to go out and buy one if you notice the cops have been around and blunted yours.

https://twitter.com/Boymum1/status/1139138581090492421

Many are questioning why, if there’s enough evidence to replace someone’s kitchenware, police aren’t just arresting the abuser instead.

Others are pointing out that kitchen knives are sharp for a reason, and that trying to cook with a blunt knife is actually dangerous in and of itself.

https://twitter.com/edgar_a_bitch/status/1138945228126281729

So far, the program is still in the trial stage and only being tried in one small area. Hopefully, that means a better solution will be thought up in the meantime. 

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H/T ITV

Siobhan Ball

Siobhan Ball

Siobhan Ball is a historian, archivist, and journalist. She also writes for Autostraddle and bi.org