With LulzXmas, Anonymous aims to siphon $1 million from the 1%

The hacktivist collective claims to have already spent $76,000 of banks’ “lovely money” on “virtual e-credit cards.”

Mar 3, 2020, 9:51 am*

Tech

Fruzsina Eördögh 

Fruzsina Eördögh

Anonymous is “giving Santa a break this year.”

In a PasteBin document purportedly posted by Destructive Sec, the hactivist collective claimed as part of LulzXmas to be “stealing from the banks who stole from you and giving you back what was rightfully yours in the first place.”

The collective has allegedly spent $76,000 of banks’ “lovely money” on “virtual e-credit cards,” according to the Project Anon News interview. The gifts Anons have given with that money have primarily been Apple products.

The DestructiveSec member went on to say the collective was aiming to siphon $1 million from bank accounts held by the wealthy.

When Anonymous released its first LulzXmas video, many outlets viewed it as a compilation video, or a year-in-review, with a hint of a threat. A second video, recently released, was equally confusing and very creepy, warning of an AnonSanta that abducts children through chimneys.

But according to the lulzfunny Twitter account, Anonymous dished out more than $6000 on 150 gifts on Dec. 16, one of which included a GeForce GTX 580, a top of the line graphics card.

In an earlier Project Anon News post, two hackers known as “Charrie” and “LulzFunny” claimed to be the two running the operation, though the Daily Dot’s AntiSec source also hinted at some involvement outside of the bank hanks. (It’s possible many groups are doing various things for LulzXmas.)

If LulzXmas sounds familiar, that’s because it is. About a month ago, Team Poison, another Anonymous collective, announced Operation Robin Hood, a similar operation that promised to give money back to the poor by exploiting major credit cards company policy of refunding fraudulent charges.

Photo by @jalbertbowdenii

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*First Published: Dec 20, 2011, 7:16 pm