Atlanta Hawks keep targeting millennial fans, offer them digital season tickets

From the NBA team that brought us Tinder Night for all of its single fans, the Atlanta Hawks are offering millennial supporters a chance to buy season tickets without actually having to pick up or, you know, hold the tickets.

As the Hawks announced on Wednesday, they’re offering a newly created Season PASS that is fully digital and which doesn’t actually give you seats to a game until only a few minutes before the tip-off. Clearly, it’s meant to be bought and consumed by the younger, more tech-savvy fans.

“The Hawks PASS program is a great new addition to our ticket portfolio. Our younger fans consume entertainment in a very different way and this option speaks directly to their decision-making process,” Kyle Brunson, the team’s senior vice president of ticket sales and service, said in a statement. “It’s perfect for millennials, who are not as focused on exactly where they sit in Philips Arena, but are more concerned with just being in the electric atmosphere of the game with their friends and other Hawks’ fans.”

Here’s how it works: The PASS costs six monthly payments of $67 or a one-time payment of $399 that guarantees entry to all but three Atlanta home games. Then, the ticket holders will use the team’s app to register and redeem the tickets while at the arena before the game. Fifteen minutes before the contest begins, the ticket holder is notified where he or she will be sitting.  

As the Atlanta Business Chronicle writes, Hawks CEO Steve Koonin has said the franchise has been “extraordinarily successful” in getting millennials to attend games. “The language and currency of millennials is digital,” he said in February 2015. “We’ve been very digitally active… We’ve become a property that really is talking to a generation.”

H/T The Comeback

Josh Katzowitz

Josh Katzowitz

Josh Katzowitz is a staff writer at the Daily Dot specializing in YouTube and boxing. His work has appeared in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and Los Angeles Times. A longtime sports writer, he's covered the NFL for CBSSports.com and boxing for Forbes. His work has been noted twice in the Best American Sports Writing book series.