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Rumuki

Screengrab via Rumuki

When one person stops sharing, both people stop watching.

It has never been easier to show your junk to another person online. Snapchat, Kik, Messenger, text messages, email, DMs, carefully angled shots on Instagram—if you want someone to see your business, you’ve got a lot of options.

But along with those options comes the risk of exposure. Someone can download your photos and videos and share them long after you might want them to. That’s why Rumuki is such an interesting idea.

Rumuki is a two-sided intimate content-sharing system. Users take videos to share with another person they’ve connected with. Video are locked with two keys, one for each device. Those are the only devices that can open the video. Videos are encrypted and can’t be played without the permission of each device. Users can also remove viewing permissions whenever they want.

This fixes the issue of using Snapchat for sexting, which only allows you to see a clip someone sends once. However, in its current form, Rumuki still suffers from Snapchat’s weakness of being susceptible to screenshots.

Ultimately, though, the app wants to protect people from revenge porn, and its ability to send personal video without having it downloaded (much like Kik) hopes to quell users’ fears their sex tapes can be distributed without their consent. Also, your content is never stored on or sent to Rumuki’s servers, so you won’t have to worry about hackers breaking into its database to steal pictures of your genitals.

You can download Rumuki for free in the iOS Store now.

IRL
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