Australian supermodel’s breastfeeding magazine cover sparks social-media movement

More than three out of four U.S. infants aged 19 to 35 months were breastfed at birth in 2013. That means there are a lot of mothers out there who need to feed their babies a lot of the time, and sometimes they have to do it in public. But despite how many people are impacted by this, it’s still considered taboo.

That’s why it was so shocking when supermodel Nicole Trunfio appeared on the cover of the June 2015 Australian Elle looking stunning while breastfeeding her son Zion. The issue was only available to subscribers, but the image has since gone viral.

Breastfeeding is something that people can barely tolerate seeing at a local mall, let alone on the front of a glossy ladies’ magazine. Even Today Show host Hoda Kotb called it “TMI” on Friday morning’s show.

But Trunfio immediately fought back against her detractors with a Facebook post.

[Placeholder for https://www.facebook.com/NicoleTrunfioOfficial/photos/a.139381219416054.17499.136766736344169/946840662003435/?type=1&permPage=1 embed.]

Now breastfeeding moms and non-moms alike are rallying behind Trunfio and the #NormalizeBreastFeeding hashtag to show their support for her cover—and for all women who feel comfortable feeding their infants in public.

Twitter users are saying bravo to Elle and Trunfio.

Instagram users are posting their own #NormalizeBreastFeeding photos in a manner similar to the #FreeTheNipple social media movement. The hashtag has 96,000 entries on the media-sharing site.

Good morning!!

A photo posted by Leah (@lgeorgens) on

#normalizebreastfeeding 💕

A photo posted by EmilyJane🌻 (@___emilyjane) on

But let’s let Ryan Gosling settle this one once and for all.

Editor’s note: This story has been updated to provide more context.

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Photo via Nicole Trunfio/Facebook

Marisa Kabas

Marisa Kabas

Marisa Kabas is a lifestyle reporter and activist. Her work has been published by Fusion, Fast Company, and Today. She’s also served as an editorial campaigns director for Purpose PBC, a social movement incubator.