The Internet is swooning over the sad story behind an eBay wedding dress

charity shop in the UK has successfully tracked down the anonymous man who donated his late wife’s wedding dress with a touching note pinned to it.

“I wish any lady who takes this dress to have a life with her loved one, 56 years like I did, happy years,” reads the note. “I was a lucky man to marry a lady like mine.”

StGemmasShop/eBay

The dress (and note) turned up at a store that supports St. Gemma’s Hospice, which provides care for medical patients suffering from cancer and other terminal illnesses. The note generated all kinds of local interest, so the hospice put the dress on eBay to make it available around the world. It worked, and now the beautiful lace wedding dress has gone viral.

Screenshot

“Overall this dress is in great condition for its age,” the item description reads. “There are no visible holes or tears in the fabric and there is no apparent discoloration[…] There is a large stain on the bottom layer of the skirt, however this is again not visible when the netting is over the top.”

The mystery donor wants to remain anonymous, but he is “over the moon” that the wedding dress is on eBay. 

“He is a big fan of St Gemma’s Hospice and is overwhelmed with the international attention that his late wife’s dress is generating,” reads a Facebook post by the hospice. “He is so happy and proud that the hospice will benefit from funds raised by the auction of the dress […] We have thanked him so much for his kindness and he would like to thank everyone for their support.”

The bidding for the dress is currently at £550, or $852. Proceeds will be donated to the St. Gemma’s Hospice charity. 

H/T Mashable | Photo via StGemmasShop/eBay

Dylan Love

Dylan Love

Dylan Love is an editorial consultant and journalist whose reporting interests include emergent technology, digital media, and Russian language and culture. He is a former staff writer for the Daily Dot, and his work has been published by Business Insider, International Business Times, Men's Journal, and the Next Web.