Prince NPG Music Club

Photo via The Prince Online Museum

A walk down a digital memory lane.

A library of Prince's internet legacy is now available for perusal. A site called the Prince Online Museum is displaying 12 of Prince's most popular websites. The site is hosted by Sam Jennings, who was also the webmaster for the award-winning Prince’s NPG Music Club, Billboard reports.

The late musician was not only a revolutionary entertainer, but he was also among one of the most outspoken advocates for creators' rights, and embraced digital tools including websites, social media, and online distribution throughout his career. Notably, Prince pulled his music from streaming services last year, and his collection is only available to stream on Tidal.

The Prince Online Museum features the now-defunct sites just as they were, lovingly and digitally preserved. You can scroll through a timeline of his work and browse sties individually. The Prince Online Museum also features interviews with some of the websites' creators, reliving their memories of the pop culture icon.

The Prince Online Museum

On the site's about page, Jennings writes:

We launch with over a dozen of Prince’s most popular sites, but over 20 years online, Prince launched nearly 20 different websites, maintained a dozen different social media presences, participated in countless online chats, and directly connected with fans around the world. This Museum is an archive of that work and a reminder of everything he accomplished as an independent artist with the support of his vibrant and dedicated online community.

Jennings notes that the site is entirely a labor of love, and the creators, who all worked with Prince directly, are not getting paid for it. Additionally, they won't be selling downloads or memberships to the sites.

H/T Billboard

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