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How not to respond to Jennifer Lawrence's leaked nudes

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The massive privacy violation that exposed naked pictures of numerous celebrities has inspired a lot of discussion about taking, sharing, and storing private images. Because this is the Internet, there’s a fair amount of awfulness mixed in with the scattering of sensible comments.

Comedian Ricky Gervais is the highest-profile person to land in hot water over insensitive remarks about the incident. In a tweet that he subsequently deleted, Gervais wrote, “Celebrities, make it harder for hackers to get nude pics of you from your computer by not putting nude pics of yourself on your computer.”

In a series of follow-up tweets, Gervais remained unapologetic and criticized those whom he offended.

Gervais is far from the only person making the argument that celebrities who don’t take the proper security precautions are to blame for the results. This line of reasoning, which often surfaces whenever a woman is the victim of an invasion of privacy either physical or virtual, is out in full force today. Both men and women are blaming the celebrities who were victimized yesterday for failing to prevent the actions of a determined hacker.

While it is fair and uncontroversial to suggest that people take precautions online, victim-blamers have been twisting the notion of personal responsibility to suggest that celebrities who are hacked deserve their fate if they didn’t do everything they could to prevent such a breach.

This phenomenon is not new. Witness this tweet from June commenting on a story that could have turned tragic and was already deeply depressing.

Meanwhile, the leak was too creepy even for some redditors:

And several celebrities whose photos were seemingly exposed have responded with grace and humor. Here's what Glee's Becca Tobin, whose alleged leaked photos showed her next to a Christmas tree, tweeted:

Photo via TK