This Sunday, the Seattle Seahawks and Denver Broncos will face off for the NFL's highest honor in Super Bowl XLVIII. And from team highlights to alternative games to even a full explanation of the game, the Internet has you covered as the big day approaches.

No cable? No problem

Obviously, cord cutters who want to watch the game will be at either NFL.com or FoxSports.com, where the entirety of Super Bowl XLVIII will be streamed live. The only catch is that the famous set of Super Bowl commercials will differ from the televised feed.

Out of sight, but not out of mind

Despite the wider reach of the Big Game, not everyone will be able to devote a full four hours to watching it. Fortunately, fans can discreetly receive a steady stream of updates and alerts to keep them abreast of the action on the field. If this is you, there are app solutions. If This Then That (IFTTT) is a site that creates app "recipes" to enhance your mobile experience, the ESPN app can send constant updates and alerts to fans who may be stuck at work during the game.

Cute overload

If football isn't your thing, you can still spend Super Bowl Sunday enjoying a different—and far more adorable—matchup: the Puppy Bowl! For the 10th year in a row, Animal Planet will be holding the annual Puppy Bowl, which will stream live from New York City.

If you don't like football or puppies (what’s wrong with you?), there is still hope for Super Bowl Sunday entertainment, believe it or not! Pounce on over to Hallmark.com and check out the first-ever Kitten Bowl! Hosted by activist Beth Stern and announced by New York Yankees announcer John Sterling, the Kitten Bowl will also be streamed live. If you don't like football, puppies, or kittens, then you simply aren't human.

Wait… what’s football?

Do football's complicated, ever-changing, and seemingly improvised rules confuse you? Of course they do! Thankfully, Fraser Davidson explains it all in the video "A Guide to American Football." Hilarious animation sequences breathe life into everything from the NFL's organization to the origins of team names… plus about "two hundred pages of regulatory minutiae."