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BTW

Harsher repercussions are coming for YouTubers who violate the community guidelines.

In a post on YouTube’s Creators blog Thursday night, CEO Susan Wojcicki outlined her “top priorities” for the streaming community in 2018. The most timely goal is the company’s interest in addressing creators who upload and promote disturbing content. According to Wojcicki, YouTube is “currently developing policies that would lead to consequences if a creator does something egregious that causes significant harm to our community as a whole.”

Wojcicki’s remarks come just weeks after the company cut business ties with popular vlogger Logan Paul in the wake of a controversial video featuring footage of an apparent suicide victim.

“While these instances are rare, they can damage the reputation and revenue of your fellow creators,” she wrote. “So we want to make sure we have policies in place that allow us to respond appropriately.”

Wojcicki doesn’t get into the specifics of what kinds of changes may be coming, exactly, but she did say YouTube is working with “dozens of expert advisors and third-parties”—like the Anti-Defamation League and National Suicide Prevention Lifeline—for counsel on these new policy efforts. She says the company plans to continue using machine-learning algorithms and its beefed-up moderation team of 10,000 people to prevent inappropriate content from making it to an audience in 2018.

She’s also hoping to improve transparency at the company, as well as audience engagement, creator support, and monetization.

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