This viral optical illusion is not actually a stress test

Yurii Perepadia

It seems we’ll have to find another way to convince people we’re stressed out.

An optical illusion has been making the rounds on social media claiming to be a stress test, but the artist says the whole thing is fake.

It all started when the image was posted on Tumblr last week with a caption saying the illusion was created by a Japanese neurology professor Yamamoto. The instructions the post gave were: “If it’s not moving, or just moving a little, you are healthy and [have] slept well. If it’s moving slowly, you are a bit stressed or tired. If it’s moving continuously, you are over-stressed.”

The post quickly went viral and people were convinced they were stressed AF.

“Overstressed and have mental problems, sounds about right,” one person said.

https://twitter.com/GinaHughes__/status/1064813192088625152

People were even questioning if the test could get them out of work. “Do you think I’ll be able to show my boss this today in proof that I’m absolutely shattered,” another person said on Twitter.

The artist of the illusion, Yurii Perepadia, is a 50-year-old graphic designer and illustrator from Ukraine. He told BuzzFeed News nothing the caption claims is true. The image will not determine your stress level at all. He took to Instagram yesterday to set the record straight.

“I drew this optical illusion in Adobe Illustrator on September 26, 2016. To create it, I used the effect of Akioshi Kitaoka. This is a white and black stroke on a colored background, this is a white and black stroke on a colored background, which sets in motion the focus of vision and it seems to a person that the details of the image are moving,” he wrote. “Japanese psychotherapist Yamamoto Hashima has nothing to do with this picture. Moreover, Yamamoto Hashima does not really exist.”

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I drew this optical illusion in Adobe Illustrator on September 26, 2016. To create it, I used the effect of Akioshi Kitaoka. This is a white and black stroke on a colored background, this is a white and black stroke on a colored background, which sets in motion the focus of vision and it seems to a person that the details of the image are moving. Japanese psychotherapist Yamamoto Hashima has nothing to do with this picture. Moreover, Yamamoto Hashima does not really exist. Google to help.
А теперь на русском.
Эту оптическую иллюзию я нарисовал в Адобе Иллюстраторе 26 сентября 2016 года. Для ее создания я использовал эффект Акиоши Китаока – это белая и черная обводка на цветном фоне, которая приводит в движение фокус зрения и человеку кажется что детали изображения движутся. Японский психотерапевт Ямамото Хашима не имеет никакого отношения к этой картинке. Более того, Ямамото Хашима не существует на самом деле. Погуглите ради интереса.

A post shared by Yurii Perepadia (@yuryfrom) on

It seems we’ll have to find another way to convince people we’re stressed out. It looks like this is just another viral post on the internet to remind us not to believe everything we read.

Gabrielle Sorto

Gabrielle Sorto

Gabrielle Sorto is an Atlanta-based freelance writer covering culture, lifestyle, and news. Her work has appeared in CNN, Teen Vogue, INSIDER, and Vice. She can usually be found writing with an overpriced coffee in hand or hanging out with her dog, Rihanna, who is named after exactly who you think.