Everyone’s losing it over this joke about Cleopatra looking like Britney Spears

Did the storied Egyptian queen Cleopatra look like the spitting image of Britney Spears? Almost certainly not. And that’s the joke behind a very good, very popular tweet that claims a 3D Britney model is a Harvard University reconstruction of the ancient queen’s face.

This is actually just a model from the game Britney’s Dance Beat, and that’s the punchline: Britney is a true queen. But when @lovemedown posted it, two very funny things happened. One, people somehow thought it was real—and even started to get mad about it. Two, it became a huge meme. Now everyone’s posting their own “models of Cleopatra.”

Let’s look at the angry reactions first, because they are really something. The attempts to scientifically explain the error in what should have been an obvious joke are the exact type of special delight that Twitter dot com was made to deliver.

The original poster can’t believe people are missing the humor:

But the people who got the joke loved it, and now everyone’s posting their own interpretations of Cleopatra.

Some are shouting out contemporary queens—Rihanna, Beyoncé, Gaga—in the same way that the original post stanned for Britney:

Others are just using selfies, bad 3D models, or whatever funny meme pictures they can think of. It’s wildly easy to participate in this meme. Any photo will do, although some are funnier than others.

https://twitter.com/deaddilf69/status/966810789771382784

There are already hundreds of these posts and, as of Thursday night, there were more going up every minute. This is like the female version of the 2016 “ideal male body” meme, where people posted their comical interpretations of a fit man:

Like “ideal male body,” the Cleopatra joke will eventually die down, but there will be callbacks to it for years to come. Just when you forgot how funny it was, someone will do the joke.

And someone else will be there to say, “It’s Britney, bitch.”

Jay Hathaway

Jay Hathaway

Jay Hathaway is a former senior writer who specialized in internet memes and weird online culture. He previously served as the Daily Dot’s news editor, was a staff writer at Gawker, and edited the classic websites Urlesque and Download Squad. His work has also appeared on nymag.com, suicidegirls.com, and the Morning News.