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How to watch ‘Power’ online for free

Starz

Here’s everything you need to know to watch the hit show.

Power, the story of James St. Patrick’s struggle from drug kingpin to legitimate businessman, has held Starz’ audience captive since 2014. With season 6 on the horizon, you’ll want to make sure you’re ready to watch. Whether that means jumping into the new season, needing to binge through the last few, or even just dipping your toe into the series without spending a ton, we’ve got you covered. Here’s how to watch Power online for free.

How to watch Power online for free

If you’re looking to watch Power online for free, you have options ranging from Amazon Prime Video to the Starz app to a handful of live TV streaming services. Each of the streaming services come with at least a free seven-day trial.

1) Sling TV

Cost: $25 to $40 per month (after a 7-day free trial) for Sling TV | $9 per month for Starz
Sling TV devices: Amazon Fire TVs, Android Fire Stick, Apple TV, Android TV, Roku, Xbox One, Google Chromecast, Oculus Go, and iOS and Android devices

Sling TV is split up between two packages, so you can choose whether to pay $25 per month for a single package or double up for $40. Either way, the Starz add-on—and thus a Power live stream—will cost an additional $9 per month. If premium channels are your thing, Sling has plenty to pick from at competitive prices. (Here’s the complete guide to Sling TV channels.)

TRY SLING TV FOR FREE


2) Hulu and Hulu with Live TV

watch power online free Hulu

Cost:  $7.99 to $40 per month (after a 7-day free trial) for Hulu or Hulu with Live TV | $8.99 per month for Starz (after a 1-month free trial)
Hulu devicesRoku, Apple TV, Google Chromecast, Amazon Fire Stick and Fire TV, Xbox One, Xbox 360, Nintendo Switch, and iOS and Android devices

Hulu‘s basic service has all five seasons of Power available to stream on-demand. At just $7.99 per month (or $4 more per month to watch commercial-free), it’s one of the best ways to watch Power online. But when it comes to new episodes, you’ll want to add Starz as a premium channel to Hulu with Live TV, which offers more than 50 channels for $40 per month and includes a free Hulu account. Even better: You can preview Starz for a full month before you’ll be charged.

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TRY HULU LIVE TV FOR FREE


3) Amazon Prime Video

Cost: $8.99 per month for Starz | $119.99 per year for Amazon Prime
Devices: Amazon Fire Stick, Fire TV, Fire tablets, and Fire phone; Roku, Google TV, TiVo, Nvidia Shield, PlayStation 3 and 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Wii

If you already have a Prime subscription, Amazon Prime Video is an easy way to add Starz to your viewing lineup. Even better, you’ll get access to all previous seasons of Power (and any other Starz show), so you’ll have no trouble catching up. If you don’t feel like subscribing to a monthly service, or you just want to try the series, you can buy individual episodes for $2.99 a pop. Only seasons 2 ($9.99) and 5 ($19.99) are available for purchase, and not every season will let you buy all individual episodes.

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TRY AMAZON PRIME FOR FREE


4) Starz app

how to watch power online free - starz app Starz

Cost: $8.99 per month
Devices: iOS, Android, Amazon Fire TV, Roku, Mac, PC, Apple TV, Android TV, Fire Stick, Xbox One, Xbox One S, select Samsung Smart TVs

The Starz app is the cheapest and most direct way to stream Power. Not only do you get every current and previous episode of Power, but you’ll also get access to any other Starz show, like Outlander and American Gods, plus Starz’ lineup of current popular films.

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TRY STARZ


5) YouTube TV

Cost: $49.99 per month (after a 7-day free trial) for YouTube TV | $9 per month for Starz
YouTube TV devices: Google Chromecast, Roku, Apple TV, Android TV, Xbox One, iOS and Android devices

YouTube TV is an all-around solid streaming choice with plenty of entertainment and sports options, including AMC, Bravo, and ESPN (though the service doesn’t carry HBO or NFL Network). The Starz add-on package, and thus the ability to stream Power, costs an additional $9 per month(Here’s the complete guide to YouTube TV channels.)

TRY YOUTUBE TV FOR FREE

 


How to watch Power Seasons 1-5 for free

Starz app and website

Cost: $8.99 per month
Devices: iOS, Android, Amazon Fire TV, Roku, Mac, PC, Apple TV, Android TV, Fire Stick, Xbox One, Xbox One S, select Samsung Smart TVs

The Starz app is the cheapest and most direct way to stream every season of Power. You get every episode of Power, plus access to any other Starz show, including Outlander and American Gods, and Starz’ lineup of popular films.

If you want to watch Power on the official site, you can use your login from one of the above streaming services. Go to the site, click “find your provider,” use the same login from that service, and you should be good to go.

Power seasons 1-5 is also available on Hulu’s on-demand library, Vudu, regular YouTube (up to season 4), iTunes, and Google Play. If you’re looking to just dip your toes in with an episode or two, one of these options is a solid pick at an average of $1.99 to $2.99 per episode.

TRY STARZ FOR FREE

New to cord-cutting? Here are our picks for the best movie streaming sites of 2018 and free live TV apps and channels. If you’re looking for a specific channel, here’s how to watch HBO, Showtime, Starz, Sundance TV, ESPN, ESPN2, ESPN3, ESPNU, Willow, AMC, FX, Fox News, Freeform, MSNBC, CNN, CNBC, FS1, TBS, TNT, Tennis Channel, Golf Channel, Syfy, HGTV, Cartoon Network/Adult Swim, Bravo, Lifetime, Discovery, PBS, the CW, BBC, CSPAN, NBA TV, MTV, Comedy Central, Food Network, TLC, HLN, A&E, Animal Planet, National Geographic, the Weather Channel, the History Channel, and NFL RedZone without cable, as well as free movies on YouTube. If you’re on the move, here’s how to watch Fox Sports Go and live stream NBC Sports.

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Joseph Knoop

Joseph Knoop

Joseph Knoop is a gaming writer for Daily Dot, a native Chicagoan, and a slave to all things Overwatch. He co-founded the college geek culture outlet ByteBSU, then interned at Game Informer, and now writes for a bunch websites his parents have never heard of.