VineCreators/Twitter FuPoo/Twitter JayceWeil/Twitter (Fair Use) Remix by Samantha Grasso

Nearly a year after Vine’s departure, Vine Camera lives.

We lost Vine in January, and boy did the world miss those 6-second videos in 2017.

Lady Gaga falling from the sky during the Super Bowl halftime show; Melania Trump swatting away her husband’s hand; the president throwing paper towels into crowds of Puerto Rico’s Hurricane Maria survivors—2017 was full of vine-able moments, and yet, the application that once mashed video and audio of sports games, inappropriate speeches, and everyday life was available as but a shell of its former self.

With the end of Vine came Vine Camera, a phone application that allowed users to create and share longer versions of these videos. But the app’s limited functions left former viners and fans scratching their heads, and flocking to YouTube and Musical.ly instead.

The app’s low favorability (a measly 1.5 stars on the Apple App Store) didn’t detract all users: The Vine Camera videos posted by earnest folks were no match for the old days, but believers in Vine Camera ended up creating something perhaps more genuine, or even ethereal.

These Vine Camera videos are reminiscent of the early days of Vine, when jerky, jump-cut videos showcasing everyday life, creativity, and even unfunny people trying their best to impress the internet hit the popular pages. Scrolling through these videos made with Vine Camera feels like when you could open the app in 2013 and watch content spun from the mind of nobodies—people who weren’t monetized personalities. Before Jessi Vazquez, Logan Paul, and Liza Koshy were famous on Vine, they were just people who made other people laugh.

If this platform is any indication of what we might be able to expect for V2, the upcoming Vine reboot announced by co-creator Dom Hofmann earlier this month, then we might have something to look forward to in 2018, after all.

The best Vine Camera videos of 2017:

Of course, we had a huge early resurgence of people “trying out” the app for the first time, as if it was any more complicated than using the original Vine itself.

What really brought Vine Camera back to its roots were the random posts people made—short moments of life, strange interactions, and truly disturbing facial expressions. Yes, the golden days of Vine, anew.

And no Vine iteration would be Vine without people attempting to launch their comedy careers off the platform—as detrimental as that might have been for the app in the first place.

With Twitter enabling 6-second Camera Vine videos to automatically loop, camera tricks, guitar riffs, and other pieces of art have continued to find their place on the app.

Undoubtedly, much of Vine Camera’s videos were used to, well, complain about Vine’s absence and the seeming pointlessness of Vine Camera itself.

Thank you for the sad, awkward, middle school phase of Vine, Vine Camera. We will cherish these memories forever—or just long enough for V2 to get off the ground.

Samantha Grasso

Samantha Grasso

Samantha Grasso is an IRL staff writer for the Daily Dot with a reporting emphasis on immigration. Her work has appeared on Los Angeles Magazine, Death And Taxes, Revelist, Texts From Last Night, Austin Monthly, and she has previously contributed to Texas Monthly.

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