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YouTuber Jesus Christ responds to sexual misconduct allegation

Jesus Christ/YouTube

A fellow YouTuber said Jesus Christ inappropriately touched him.

A YouTuber named Jesus Christ received a huge spike in popularity this week when PewDiePie promoted his channel and compelled plenty of his fans to subscribe. But since then, Jesus Christ—who has committed to the role with his trademark beard, robe, and reportedly changing his legal name—has had to respond to a sexual misconduct allegation by another YouTuber. And now, the accuser has apologized.

In a video uploaded on Jan. 8, the YouTube channel the God of Cringe said Jesus Christ inappropriately touched him at the VidCon video conference two years ago and that Jesus Christ might be masturbating to a video of the incident.

“People need to know who he really, truly is,” the God of Cringe said.

In God of Cringe’s video, he said he met Jesus Christ at VidCon and they agreed to a collaboration where they would interview each other to create content for both channels.

“The problem was that during this interview, things got really weird,” the God of Cringe said. “He requested I unbutton my shirt during the interview, revealing my nipple. That’s when he pulled out a marker from his pocket and began to draw around my nipple. He had my nipple covered in marker ink, which I didn’t feel comfortable with. Then, he touched the marker to the top of my nipple. It was traumatic…

“The only way I could see overlooking this at this time was that he follow through on his word and release the footage. Which he never did. Which leads me to believe he could be pleasuring himself, possibly masturbating, to the video to this day. That may sound far-fetched, but the fact he didn’t release the video means two things: that he’s not the fully honest man I believed he was and that he could be a much sicker man than I thought, possibly deriving sexual pleasure from someone who was 25.”

In his YouTube response on Wednesday, Jesus Christ said the God of Cringe was lying and accused him of “clout chasing,” where a smaller YouTuber (God of Cringe has 16,000 YouTube subscribers) will try to use the popularity of far bigger YouTuber (Jesus Christ has 952,000 subscribers) to make themselves more popular. He then showed the footage from the incident.

Jesus Christ said he didn’t ask the God of Cringe to lift his shirt—instead, Jesus Christ said he did it of his own volition (he also wasn’t wearing a shirt that could be unbuttoned). He said the God of Cringe pulled the marker out of his own pocket, and Jesus Christ said he asked if it was OK to sign his nipple (Jesus Christ also said another YouTuber had already signed the God of Cringe’s chest and had drawn an ejaculating penis). Jesus Christ said the God of Cringe gave his consent for everything.

In the video, the God of Cringe said, “Oh my gosh, Jesus Christ. You’re getting me going.”

“Hopefully,” Jesus Christ said in his recently uploaded video, “you can see from that footage that nothing shady went down. It was just an awkward exchange, at worst.”

In a video released Wednesday, the God of Cringe apologized if he got anything wrong in his video. “I was solely relying on my memory from that time. As we all know, memories do fade. Since you had the actual video where you drew on my nipple … I really had nothing to refer to. … I do want to apologize if I got anything wrong.”

Last week, PewDiePie, the world’s most popular YouTuber, featured Jesus Christ on a video and that he needs monetary help from his fans to help pay for lawyers to regain custody of his children. PewDiePie linked to Jesus Christ’s Patreon account, and in the past week, Jesus Christ has gained nearly 300,000 YouTube subscribers.

Josh Katzowitz

Josh Katzowitz

Josh Katzowitz is a staff writer at the Daily Dot specializing in YouTube and boxing. His work has appeared in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and Los Angeles Times. A longtime sports writer, he's covered the NFL for CBSSports.com and boxing for Forbes. His work has been noted twice in the Best American Sports Writing book series.