BoJack Horseman s2

Photo courtesy of Netflix

From biting comedies to gut-punch mysteries, it’s all here.

I signed up for Netflix back in 2005. My first rental was the short-lived and quickly forgotten Jay Mohr series Action. It was a long, tedious slog.

Now it’s common to make plans to binge seasons of shows in a day. Between Netflix’s rapidly expanding original content empire and the shows it has the rights for, prioritizing your My List requires more strategy than ever. 

Here are our recommendations to help get you started. —Eddie Strait

The best TV shows on Netflix  

1) Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt

This is a top-tier Netflix show and should already be locked into your My List. I’m not sure we deserve someone as brilliant as Tina Fey running a TV show, but it’s the most pleasant kind of burden for us to bear. Freed of NBC’s shackles (the network bailed on it), season 2 is even Kimmy-ier and better. —Eddie Strait

Netflix US & Canada/YouTube

2) BoJack Horseman

This is Kimmy Schmidt’s companion in the Netflix Originals hierarchy. It’s as funny as any of Netflix’s comedies and its more dramatic moments land harder than most of the company’s dramas. It’s one of those shows that’s hard to convince yourself to watch on paper—an odd-looking, animated series where Will Arnett voices a talking horse—but once you take the plunge you won’t look back. —E.S.

BoJack Horseman/Netflix

3) Terriers

FX’s one-season wonder is a nice change of pace from ultra-serious crime shows. It still has all the lasciviousness you expect from a noir-ish story, but the chemistry between leads Donal Logue and Michael Raymond-James softens the harder edges just enough.  —E.S.

MadchesterRu/YouTube

4) Broadchurch

If you prefer dark mysterious and gut-punch revelations, this British import is what you’re looking for. David Tennant and Olivia Coleman are an odd couple investigating a death that has shaken up an entire community. The first season is great and makes a fine stopping point if you’ve had enough. But the second season rewards those who want to dive deeper into the fallout of the first season’s resolution.  —E.S.

BrenianTVplease/YouTube

5) Malcolm in the Middle

This Fox Sunday staple was around way longer than you probably remember (seven seasons) and is better than your memory of it. It really is a live-action The Simpsons. The show was free to do whatever it wanted in any given episode. No idea is too absurd here. How else to explain plot lines like Dewey and Hal helping each other kick cigarette and coffee addictions? —E.S.

6) Comedy Bang! Bang!

A twist on the traditional talk show, Comedy Bang! Bang! shrugs off promotional interviews and banter in favor of sketch-comedy chaos. Host Scott Aukerman is our channel into the lives of celebrities and comedians, as his earnest questioning inevitably gives way to awkward pauses and memorable characters like Bob Ducca and Paul F. Tompkins’s Cake Boss. —Audra Schroeder

7) Black Mirror

One of the things that make this modern-day Twilight Zone a great streaming option is the standalone factor of each episode. The show goes to some bleak and nihilistic places to make its techno-terror satire land, so it helps that you don’t need to worry about tracking multiple storylines and relationships. Each episode features a new cast (including the likes of Hayley Atwell, Domhnall Gleeson, and Jon Hamm) and a premise taken to its extreme. Netflix premiered season three back in October, and while the critical reception was a little more volatile than before, the show still delivered an all-timer with “San Junipero,” as well as a couple other solid episodes. There is more coming in 2017, and we couldn’t be more excited.  —E.S.

Screengrab via Netflix UK & Ireland

8) Awake

This show never had a chance on NBC. It’s about a cop (Jason Isaacs) who lives in two worlds. In one his wife is dead and his son is alive, but when he goes to sleep he wakes up in the other world with a dead son and grieving wife. And his cases have a tendency to cross over in random ways. Of course nobody watched it, it’s way too dense. But taken in binge form, it’s easier to track the two worlds and highly rewarding. —E.S.

9) Rectify

This is another one for those willing to take a leap of faith. Rectify is meditative, glacially paced, and deals with spirituality in a way not often seen on TV. Daniel Holden is working his way back into a society that doesn’t want him after spending 19 years on death row. What the show lacks in narrative flash it makes up for with a strong ensemble and outstanding writing. Few shows are as focused on the reverberations of daily minutiae as Rectify, and that’s where many of the highlights come from. The show wrapped up its run in 2016 with a stellar, slyly funny and emotionally satisfying final season. Netflix currently has the first three seasons available and the fourth is coming soon. —E.S. 

SundanceTV/YouTube

10) Scrubs

This emo comedy used to be a staple of the syndication circuit, but now you have turn to Netflix to get your prescribed laughs. I watched this a few years ago during late-night feedings with my son and it was just as funny as ever. I didn’t even mind the dreaded medical school season at the end. You know what you’re getting with the Sacred Heart crew. —E.S.

11) Freaks and Geeks

It’s the all-time best “cancelled too soon” show. Everything everybody says about it is true. The cast is amazing and the writing is painfully on point. If you’re weary of Seth Rogen, Judd Apatow, and James Franco, pop this on to remember when you wanted them to win. —E.S.

12) Luther

If you loved Elba’s work on The Wire like any sane person, you owe it to yourself to check out his heel turn as troubled detective John Luther. Luther has a preternatural gift for solving crimes and series creator Neil Cross has a knack for deranged criminals. I usually offer this recommendation with a bit of caution because the show has a tendency to peter out at the end of episodes a little too frequently, but it’s not enough to make the show stoppable. The things the show does well (opening episodes and escalating tension; acting) are worth seeking out, especially if you’re a fan of Elba, and who among us isn’t? —E.S.

BBC/YouTube

13) Portlandia

Since debuting, IFC’s Portlandia has taken aim at hipsters, feminists, male feminists, musicians, artists, bike messengers, crafting, and Danzig. Fred Armisen and Carrie Brownstein can inhabit the bodies of the clueless, oblivious, arrogant, and uptight with ease, and have crafted some truly memorable characters in the weird, wild world of Portland. —A.S. 

14) Parks and Recreation

Who says you need to wait for a rainy day to watch Leslie Knope make the world a better place? Parks and Rec was consistently strong for all seven seasons it ran, and in particular, you’ll be hard pressed to name any show with a better run of episodes than Parks’ stretch from seasons two through four. You can pick an episode at random and almost certainly hit on a classic, or you can watch it in order and relive Leslie’s campaign against Paul Rudd or her long-running feud with all things Eagleton, or just watch every Jean-Ralphio episode. It’s your call, the only wrong way to watch Parks and Rec is to not watch it at all.  —E.S.

15) Top of the Lake

Elisabeth Moss proved she is a national treasure with her work on Mad MenLake shows her to be an international treasure. I may be showing my hand too much, but I’m a sucker for a good mystery, and guess what Lake is? The show is filming its second season now (where Moss will partner up with Games of Thrones badass Gwendoline Christine), so now is the time to get on board. —E.S.

SundanceTV/YouTube

16) The Wonder Years

Nostalgia at its best. You may not have come of age in the ’60s, but, just like Kevin Arnold, you had a best friend, a first love, a family that drove you crazy, and when you think about every teenage adventure, you can provide an adult running commentary that makes it all even better. —E.S.

17) Louie

Louie is about as singular as a show can be. Each episode is its own experiment, and Louis C.K. is just enough of a mad scientist to pull it all off. The series of mostly standalone episodes, and with very little continuity you can pick episodes out at random if you’re feeling bold, or you can go in order and watch C.K.’s talents as a filmmaker expand as the show progresses. Louie paved the way for a slew of hyper-realistic half-hour shows that push narrative and creative boundaries (including 2016 favorites Atlanta and Better Things).  —E.S.

18) Gilmore Girls

Of all the reclamation projects Netflix has embarked on, this is one that offers the most creative reward. Many fans of the show pretend the seventh season, made without the guidance of creator Amy Sherman-Palladino and her husband Daniel Palladino, doesn’t exist or at least judge it separately from seasons one through six. With the Palladinos back in the saddle for Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life we finally got the ending that we should’ve had all along, including the near mythical “final four words” that taunted fans for a decade. Watch the first six seasons, read the wiki for the seventh, and finish it off with A Year in the Life, which has its ups and downs, but the mere fact that it exists at all is something of a miracle.  —E.S.

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19) Better Call Saul

There were a lot of reasons to be skeptical of Better Call Saul when the spinoff was first announced. It felt like cashing in on one of the greatest shows (and one of the earliest Netflix binge crazes) because nobody wanted to let Breaking Bad go. And who cares about the adventures of slick-talking Saul Goodman? Through two seasons, Saul has proven itself to be more than just a good sidekick. Like it’s predecessor, Saul is one of the best dramas on the air. Bob Odenkirk is doing incredible things with Jimmy McGill, laying the tragic groundwork that will eventually lead to Saul. Through two seasons (the first is available to stream now, the second should be up soon ahead of the season 3 premiere) Saul is every bit the equal of Bad, and could end up being even better by the time it’s said and done. Time to get onboard.  —E.S.

20) iZombie

The CW has rebranded itself among the major networks as the outlet for fun genre fare, headlined by comic based shows Flash, Supergirl, and Arrow. Then there’s iZombie, which also has its origins in comics, but the superpower here is the ability to view a person’s final moments by eating their brain. The heroine is Olivia Moore (or Liv Moore for short). A party gone awry turns her into a zombie and we’re off. She works in the city morgue where she has a hearty supply of brains to sustain herself. The free sustenance comes with visions, accompanied by temporary new personalities for Liv, who uses those to help her put away a slew of murderers. The show is run by Rob Thomas (Veronica Mars, Party Down), so the weekly cases are intriguing and the dialogue is snappy.  —E.S.

21) The Grinder

Stars Rob Lowe and Fred Savage have a comforting and strong TV CV between them, so it’s not a surprise that The Grinder found critical acclaim upon debuting in 2015. Unfortunately, those good notices didn’t translate to ratings, and the show was ignominiously canceled after one season. Maybe it was the ultra meta-ness of a story about a TV lawyer (Lowe) parlaying that legal experience into real courtrooms with his brother (Savage) that kept audiences at bay. The Grinder‘s bubble popped much too soon, but the 22-episode run of hilarity is now waiting on Netflix.  —E.S.

Editor’s note: This article is regularly updated for relevance. 

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