Mourning Andy Whitfield

Andy Whitfield, known for his lead role in “Spartacus,” died on Sept. 11, 2011. Whitfield was 39, and had been battling non-Hodgkin lymphoma for a little over a year.

YouTubers, being the reflective bunch when it comes to celebrity deaths, flooded the site with Whitfield related videos and respectful comments about his passing.

Tribute videos — most featuring photos or clips of Whitfield from “Spartacus” — were uploaded, as were old interviews with the actor and personal response vlogs.

“I HATE CANCER. R.I.P Andy Whitfield love u forever. u are beautiful in and out u are the one and only Spartacus. I feel so sorry for his wife and 2 kids. this is the 1st time I have ever cried over a celebrity dying 1974-2011 R.I.P”  wrote catherinek3254 on a Whitfield fan video last night.

“RIP Andy we will miss you :'(  You were such a great actor & amazing person. This is a great tribute to a wonderful person.” wrote EpicLover161 on one of the better produced tribute videos.

Many YouTubers first exposure to Whitfield actually came from YouTube Top Content creator Freddie Wong, as YouTubers said in comments on Wong-Whitfield videos, and even in rexappel’s “RIP Andy Whitfield 1974 – 2011” vlog.

Whitfield co-starred in a short film “Time Crisis” with Wong last year.

“I thought I would find such messages here. all I can feel is sorrow and disappointment for losing such a friend as Andy!” commented NetrinoYT on “Time Crisis.” “A friend that we made through favorite tv series and amazing acting! Rest in peace from Greece too!”

Some YouTubers have even urged Wong to make a tribute video, having worked with him in person.

“Freddie should do a tribute to Andy by making a clip about blood and sand!”, wrote r6uocs on “Behind the Scenes – Time Crisis with Andy Whitfield,” with more than 130 likes by the YouTube community.

“He was easily the most fun actor we’ve ever worked with – it was an honor to have done so.” Wong tweeted on the day of Whitfield’s passing.

Fruzsina Eördögh

Fruzsina Eördögh

Fruzsina Eördögh was the Daily Dot's first YouTube reporter. In addition to working as a producer for the now-defunct digital channel TouchVision TV, Eördögh has been published by Vice, the Christian Science Monitor, the Guardian, Variety, and Slate.