That gross semen-vaping video was a dumb viral hoax

This article contains sexually explicit content.

Crushing news for fans of vaguely homoerotic YouTube stunts: The creators of a viral video that purported to show a man vaping his buddy’s semen have revealed that it was all a hoax.

In a follow-up video, a shaggy man explains the situation in what seems to be a phony accent. That wasn’t nut butter his friend vaped, he says, but sardine juice mixed with vegetable glycerine. Supposedly, the whole thing was staged as part of a lame-sounding documentary about how gullible the Internet is. Don’t they know that Jimmy Kimmel has already run this concept into the ground?        

These dudes seem awfully proud of “fooling” us media sites, despite the word “allegedly” appearing in our original headline and the story itself including the phrases “fairly skeptical” and “whether or not this was real.” We even correctly surmised that the e-liquid was mostly composed of vegetable glycerin. So… joke’s on us? Thanks for the pageviews?

In fact, we’re gonna go ahead and call bullshit on this video, too. There’s probably no documentary in the works, and if there were, why would you set your fake viral content to private after just 30,000 views? And why would any self-respecting filmmakers shoot vertical video? That’s fishy as hell. While we’re at it, “The Dress” probably isn’t real either.

Photo via TBEC Review/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Miles Klee

Miles Klee

Miles Klee is a novelist and web culture reporter. The former editor of the Daily Dot’s Unclick section, Klee’s essays, satire, and fiction have appeared in Lapham’s Quarterly, Vanity Fair, 3:AM, Salon, the Awl, the New York Observer, the Millions,  and the Village Voice. He's the author of two odd books of fiction, 'Ivyland' and 'True False.'