Heart rate emoji meme lets you show what makes your heart race

Does your heart race when you see your crush or a cute dog? Well, there’s a new heart rate meme to convey just that.

Since it’s possible to type out a meticulous series of hyphens, carets, and slashes and get across exactly what you mean, people are using the keyboard symbols to create heart rate monitors. The meme depicts a normal heart rate on the “heart rate monitor” and then another, more frenzied heart rate when something emotional happens to the person.

For example, your heart rate may go wild when you see your crush.

https://twitter.com/MisterOlawale/status/1115289431475400704

Or the exact moment you can’t feel your phone in your pocket.

https://twitter.com/TheAlteria/status/1115288233309609985

Brands are even getting in on the action, which could be a sign the meme is already growing uncool and will flatline soon. For example, Chipotle says your heart rate fluctuates when you see fresh ingredients come out just in time for your burrito.

Target knows your heart has palpitations when you see someone you know while shopping.

Sprite even knows that the McDonald’s Sprite just hits different.

And voting advocacy group When We All Vote asserts that political engagement is attractive.

Some things are enough to make your heart rate flatline. One Twitter user illustrated what happens when someone says the ill-fated words, “We need to talk.”

https://twitter.com/ItsJustJunaid/status/1115312570125230081

Or when your mom says she’ll count to three. Scary.

https://twitter.com/chrysallist/status/1115343958345965569

Or that moment when you realize you don’t know anything on an exam.

Like the pushpin emoji detour meme and the handshake emoji meme before it, it’s only a matter of time until the normal heart rate meme gives way to the next emoji trend.

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Eilish O'Sullivan

Eilish O'Sullivan

Eilish O'Sullivan is an editorial intern for the Daily Dot studying journalism and government at the University of Texas at Austin. Her work has appeared in the Austin Chronicle and the Daily Texan.