Man posts ‘back in my day’ tweets, gets roasted by Twitter

As if it wasn’t enough to blame millennials for everything. #BragAboutYourGeneration became a trending topic on Twitter Saturday, much to the chagrin of the younger generations, who took the hashtag as an opportunity to air their grievances.

https://twitter.com/Alex_Lummy/status/1030755176481779712

One user in particular, Frederic Roberto, got the backlash of his life with his viral tweet, which celebrated his generation’s ability to do things without the convenience of the internet. Some of his boasts included getting dates without Tinder, taking rides without Uber, and getting jobs without LinkedIn.

Many users were not impressed with this (barely) Gen Xer’s sanctimonious sentiment and mocked him with their own renditions of the hashtag, while others criticized him straight at the source. “[Y]ou were born in 1981 my guy, it ain’t no “my generation” by the time you were 22 cats had GPS and picture messaging. You were not in the mines,” user Richard Lawler said to Roberto.

In another biting tweet, user Roy of Red wrote, “We got hopium without @bitcoin We got scammed without @ethereum We gambled without @FunFairTech.”

Roberto took the attention in stride and tweeted about one of the responses to his post gaining popularity on Reddit. He maintained in several tweets that he was “just reminiscing.”

He posted Thursday morning, five days after the initial tweet, about his newfound fame, saying, “If there’s something I’ve learnt off the back of that simple, generational, now-oddly-famous-tweet, is that polarizing opinions do take you, unfortunately, far.” He responded to another user and claimed he wasn’t bashing younger generations or calling them lazy.

It seems like this particular episode of “technology is bad fire is scary and Thomas Edison was witch” is over, but rest assured, baby boomers and Gen x’ers will find something else to complain about.

Kristina Nguyen

Kristina Nguyen

Kristina Nguyen is an editorial intern for the Daily Dot. She is studying journalism and American studies at the University of Texas at Austin. She has previously contributed to Orange magazine and Silk Club's QUIET! zine.