A bunch of ‘Brady Bunch’ memes just broke Tumblr

Jan From The Brady Bunch

http://everythingrevival.tumblr.com/

Everyone’s talking about it at sküle.

Your first viral Tumblr meme of 2015 is here, and it has the youngs somewhat perplexed. 

Mere weeks after these kids freaked out over the microblogging platform’s “Festivus Mode” gimmick—in celebration of Seinfeld, a sitcom that peaked before they were born—they found themselves inundated with references to another retro TV classic: The Brady Bunch.

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The scene being mined comes not from the 1970s series—season 2, episode 9—and also the 1996 film A Very Brady Sequel, equal parts an homage to and parody of the saccharine show. Over family breakfast, awkward middle child Jan Brady lies about having a new boyfriend whom she names “George Glass” after looking at a glass of orange juice on the table (and deciding that “Tropicana” isn’t a real surname). Marcia Brady, her popular older sister, registers skepticism.

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The catty relationship between Marcia and Jan—as well as Marcia’s affected pronunciation of “school” and dismissive “Sure, Jan” (there’s also “Nice try, Jan”)—became fodder for GIFs, image macros, and assorted tomfoolery on a grand scale. 

The madder and more bewildered some users got about the dashboard-hijacking, the more the mutagenic memes proliferated.

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What a lot of people probably don’t remember is that—spoiler alert—George Glass turns out to be real. Or rather, Jan meets the braces-wearing boy of her dreams, who happens to share a name with her fictional paramour, while the Bradys are vacationing in Hawaii.

It’s really a lot less far-fetched than you think:

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Photo via Tumblr

Miles Klee

Miles Klee

Miles Klee is a novelist and web culture reporter. The former editor of the Daily Dot’s Unclick section, Klee’s essays, satire, and fiction have appeared in Lapham’s Quarterly, Vanity Fair, 3:AM, Salon, the Awl, the New York Observer, the Millions,  and the Village Voice. He's the author of two odd books of fiction, 'Ivyland' and 'True False.'