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Jordan XIs

Get in the holiday spirit already.

With the winter holidays in full swing we are officially in the middle of the holiday gift-giving season. For many, it’s a time to exchange with loved ones, celebrate, and reflect on the past year. If you’re a sneakerhead, this is when you scout a good camp spot for Nike’s annual end-of-year Air Jordan XI release. This year, one young sneaker enthusiast decided that instead of just focusing on how he would acquire the Jordan XIs, he would gift a pair to someone less fortunate than him.

Yaovi Mawuli, a high school student from the Greensboro, N.C. area, wrote on Facebook that he spotted a classmate sporting extremely worn sneakers when another kid in their French class began making fun of the condition of his shoes. Embracing the season, Mawuli generously decided to gift his classmate a pair of highly sought-after Jordan XI Concord sneakers. To accomplish this, Mawuli took to a local Facebook group titled Greensboro Sneakerheads to solicit advice on how to present the gift. “I’m planning to give him a pair of Concord lows,” he posted. “Now my question is how do I present it to him without him feeling like I feel sorry for him? I’m just trying to help a brother out.”

In the end his new friend was appreciative of the gift and the two even posed for a photo together.

NiceKicks/Facebook

Mawuli’s story is a testament to what the holiday season is really about. It also serves as a reminder that while it feels great to come up on an awesome pair of sneakers—sometimes it feels even better to help a brother out.

Photo via Wikipedia Commons (CC BY 2.0)

Ikenna Anyoku

Ikenna Anyoku

Ikenna Anyoku was a contributor to the Daily Dot from 2014 to 2016 focusing on viral news and entertainment. He now works as a staff attorney for the Legal Aid Society in New York.