Punch a Nazi!! is a game that’s exactly what it sounds like

It’s the face that launched a thousand fists.

Punching Nazis is nothing new—after all, the comic book heroes have been doing it for decades—but the act got a new wave of publicity after someone cold-cocked alt-right figurehead Richard Spencer during an interview last month.

It kicked off weeks of self-serious thinkpieces about the ethics of Nazi-punching (pro, con, pro, con), got its own soundtrack, and now, perhaps inevitably, has spawned the obligatory pixel-art video game.

Meet Super Deluxe’s Punch a Nazi!!, a free-to-play game that lets players use their smartphones as a controller to punch at the faces of Richard Spencer, Milo Yiannopoulos, and Hitler himself on your browser window.

Gameplay’s simple: Just type the four-letter code into your phone and get punching. If you wait for the slider at the bottom of the screen to line up with the center, you’ll achieve maximum punch power and minimize your chance of missing. After each successful hit, you’ll get a nice confirmation screen like one of the ones below, plus the satisfaction of an increasingly bloodied face to aim at.

Super Deluxe

(My phone disconnected before I was able to punch out the biggest baddie, Hitler. I hope that’s not foreshadowing.)

In any case, it’s probably a healthy release valve for all those who came down on the pro-Nazi-punching-in-theory-but-unwilling-to-face-assault-charges side of the aforementioned debate.

Once you’ve grown tired of the novelty of punching those three men in the face, consider practicing passivity on Pepe the Frog in the Pepe Punch-Out game instead.

Correction 9:21am CT, Feb. 3: An earlier version of this article misstated the name of the company behind Punch a Nazi!! That company is Super Deluxe.

H/T A/V Club

Monica Riese

Monica Riese

Monica Riese now serves as the Daily Dot’s director of production, having previously been the publication’s entertainment editor and assistant managing editor. She is based in Austin, Texas, and formerly contributed to the Austin Chronicle, where her breaking news work was recognized by the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies.