UVA students wish the rape story would just go away

university of virginia

https://www.flickr.com/photos/tabor-roeder/5551225213

Students flock to college gossip app Yik Yak to vent.

Just after the Columbia Journalism Review published a damning investigation into a much-scrutinized 2014 article about allegations of gang rape at the University of Virginia, Rolling Stone officially retracted the story, offering an apologia for a series of mistakes.  

This would seem to conclude more than four months of recriminations following the publication of “A Rape on Campus,” by Sabrina Rubin Erdely—a vicious controversy whose echoes will affect reportage on these issues for years to come. “Sexual assault is a serious problem on college campuses,” wrote Rolling Stone editor Will Dana in his commentary on the CJR conclusions, “and it is important that rape victims feel comfortable stepping forward. It saddens us to think that their willingness to do so might be diminished by our failings.”

But what say UVA’s actual students, most of whom are just trying to make it through the last week of spring semester, with some looking forward to graduation? If the chatter on the anonymous college gossip app Yik Yak is any indication, they’re none too thrilled with this latest round of media scrutiny.

Yik Yak

Yik Yak

Yik Yak

Yik Yak

Yik Yak

Yik Yak

Yik Yak

Yik Yak

Yik Yak

Some undergrads took aim at Rolling Stone itself.

Yik Yak

Yik Yak

Yik Yak

Yik Yak

Yik Yak

At least one dude, of course, was concerned about the emotional state of his fellow men.

Yik Yak

Many users, meanwhile were gossiping about more pressing concerns: sex, drugs, and even homework. Maybe someone can write an essay about the cultural consequences of a 24-hour news cycle?   

Photo via Phil Roeder/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Miles Klee

Miles Klee

Miles Klee is a novelist and web culture reporter. The former editor of the Daily Dot’s Unclick section, Klee’s essays, satire, and fiction have appeared in Lapham’s Quarterly, Vanity Fair, 3:AM, Salon, the Awl, the New York Observer, the Millions,  and the Village Voice. He's the author of two odd books of fiction, 'Ivyland' and 'True False.'