Video of American journalist beheaded as warning to Obama posted by ISIS

The Islamic State released a video on YouTube they claim to be the beheading of American photojournalist James Foley as a warning against further airstrikes in Iraq by the United States. The video was quickly removed from the site.

Foley, 40, who went missing in Syria in November 2012, was kept on his knees and dressed in an orange prisoners’ jumpsuit. He was seen alongside another journalist, Steven Joel Sotloff, who also disappeared while covering the Syrian civil war in 2013. Sotloff will die, Foley’s executioner said, if Obama doesn’t change course on Iraq.

The executioner, covered from head to toe in black, spoke with what sounded like a British accent.

Before he was beheaded, Foley read a statement that called the American government his “real killers.”

Video and images of the beheading have been spread by ISIS jihadists and sympathizers on social networks like Twitter, leading to new calls to ban the accounts.

The hashtag #ISISMediaBlackout began trending after the video went viral on Tuesday as Twitter users urged one another to avoid retweeting or sharing any graphic images from the execution video.

Major news outlets have been publicly debating whether or not to show the beheading video.

Syria, which has been described as the most dangerous place in the world for journalists to operate because of the rate at which they are killed or kidnapped, was not the location in which Foley was taken captive. [Correction: We incorrectly implied that Foley was not captured in Syria; he was, in fact, capature in Syria. Previously, in 2011, he was kidnapped in Libya. He made it out of Libyan detainment, but was again captured in Syria in 2013.]

In 2011, he was kept in detention for six weeks in Libya during the revolution against dictator Muammar Gaddafi. After the fighting was over, Foley was released unharmed.

Image via FreeJamesFoley

Patrick Howell O'Neill

Patrick Howell O'Neill

Patrick Howell O'Neill is a notable cybersecurity reporter whose work has focused on the dark net, national security, and law enforcement. A former senior writer at the Daily Dot, O'Neill joined CyberScoop in October 2016. I am a cybersecurity journalist at CyberScoop. I cover the security industry, national security and law enforcement.