Fruit of the loom tag

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What is the Fruit of the Loom Cornucopia and where did it go?

“Corporate gaslighting”

 

Aimée Lutkin

Memes

Fruit of the Loom Cornucopia refers to an ongoing debate on whether or not the Fruit of the Loom logo ever contained a cornucopia, or a long wicker horn traditionally used to carry, well, fruit. It’s gone on so long that the idea of a cornucopia is its own meme.

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Though this discourse has existed for years, it never seems to run out of steam. That’s because when looking for a low-stakes and unresolvable argument, a great choice is anything that is considered a result of the “Mandela Effect,” a phenomenon where large groups of people are convinced something happened. Except it didn’t.

For example, whether or not the beloved series of children’s books about a family of bears was following the Berensteins or the Berenstains. It’s the latter, but some folks online will never give up the dream that they grew up in an alternate reality where the Berensteins dominated library time.

It’s the same with Fruit of the Loom: so many people are convinced they saw the cornucopia growing up that it is considered a mass delusion, or the Mandela Effect. But is that fair? Here’s what we know.

Did Fruit of the Loom ever have a cornucopia? 

Officially, the answer is no. The fruit from off of ye olde loom has always been rolling around, loose and ready to be gathered, perhaps in the soft folds of a giant cotton shirt.

The company has even gone so far as to release a timeline of its logo that started in 1893 and all of its transformations over the years, beginning with a much more realistic depiction of an apple nestled in a bunch of grapes that gradually grew more simplistic and graphic over time.

Nary a cornucopia nor even a bowl or basket ever makes an appearance. Fruit of the Loom is tired of the questions and they consider the conversation closed.

Fruit of the Loom cornucopia proof

But let’s open it up again! Despite these assurances, there is a lot of “proof” circulating online concerning the cornucopia. The first and perhaps most convincing piece is a Florida newspaper article from 1994 interviewing an actor named Samuel Wright who appeared in a commercial for the brand.

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@Kurz_Prime/X.com

Wright played a bunch of grapes, and the person who wrote the article described the scene like this: “Fruit of the Loom’s logo was initially a cornucopia swollen with an apple, green grapes, purple grapes, and their green leaves.”

There are also posts on Reddit, Imgur, and TikTok that seem to show old Fruit of the Loom clothing that features a logo with a cornucopia. However, Snopes has done a very excellent job pointing out that these are fakes.

The fake logos originate from a drawing some chaotic designer released on Imgur in February 2017, another from Fruit of the Loom itself as an April Fool’s joke. That sure backfired for their brand.

There was also a moment in 1980 when a very tangentially related office in New York started a patent for the Fruit of the Loom logo with a cornucopia, but it was dismissed and then canceled eight years later.

A lot of people have opinions on the cornucopia, in which they are either still insisting it’s real or that they think people who insist it’s real are stupid:

fruit of the loom cornucopia
@lingerie_addict/X.com

fruit of the loom cornucopia
@lingerie_addict/X.com

fruit of the loom cornucopia
@lingerie_addict/X.com

fruit of the loom cornucopia
@JackWilliamRtF/X.com

fruit of the loom cornucopia
@JackWilliamRtF/X.com

But maybe the answer is somewhere in between the cornucopia being the Mandela Effect or a conspiracy that goes all the way to the top of the loom. After all, fakes of the cornucopia have been circulating for a long time now. It may not be real, but that doesn’t mean people haven’t seen it.

 
The Daily Dot