Joe Biden is officially America’s creepy uncle

Joe Biden Whispering in Stephanie Carter's Ear

The White House/YouTube (PD)

Bit of a close talker, this guy.

There’s plenty of reasons to love Vice President Joe Biden: the State of the Union reactions, the way he looks through windows, his bottomless hunger for ice cream. But even Bidenphiles admit that his easy charm often crosses a line into … weirdness.

Joe’s “creepy uncle” problem was evident at the swearing-in ceremony for Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter: Biden all but demanded that Carter’s wife Stephanie stand near him so he could squeeze her shoulders, sniff her hair, and whisper in her ear.

The White House

The White House

The White House

It’s hardly the first time that Biden has breached a woman’s personal space. There was that time he got handsy with a White House correspondent. There was the pit stop where he put the moves on a leather-clad lady biker. He’s macked on Irish presidents, Olympic athletes, Hillary Clinton, and Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan. He got close with the daughter of Sen. Chris Coons, much to her annoyance. He’s not afraid to get up in the First Lady’s face, either.  

Precedents aside, this latest awkwardness—which conservatives will probably be calling “Sniffgate” before the day is out—has piqued our curiosity: Just what did Biden say to Stephanie Carter? We hate to force a meme, but the possibilities are endless.  

GIF by Jason Reed

GIF by Jason Reed

GIF by Jason Reed

GIF by Jason Reed

GIF by Jason Reed

GIF by Jason Reed

GIF by Jason Reed

GIF by Jason Reed

GIF by Jason Reed

Got a better guess as to what’s on Joe’s mind? Here’s the GIF template—do your worst:

GIF by Jason Reed

Constitution be damned—somebody needs to appoint this man VP for life.

Photo via The White House/YouTube (PD)

Miles Klee

Miles Klee

Miles Klee is a novelist and web culture reporter. The former editor of the Daily Dot’s Unclick section, Klee’s essays, satire, and fiction have appeared in Lapham’s Quarterly, Vanity Fair, 3:AM, Salon, the Awl, the New York Observer, the Millions,  and the Village Voice. He's the author of two odd books of fiction, 'Ivyland' and 'True False.'