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Trump claims people switch clothes to commit voter fraud—and Twitter is roasting him

The Epoch Times/Flickr (CC-BY)

There’s no evidence to support Trump’s claim.

President Donald Trump continued to push unsubstantiated claims about voter fraud on Wednesday, telling a conservative news outlet that people change clothes and vote again.

The president made the claims amid frustration among many Republicans regarding the recounts underway in Florida for its gubernatorial and Senate races and in Georgia for its gubernatorial election.

“The Republicans don’t win and that’s because of potentially illegal votes,” Trump told the Daily Caller. “When people get in line that have absolutely no right to vote and they go around in circles. Sometimes they go to their car, put on a different hat, put on a different shirt, come in and vote again. Nobody takes anything. It’s really a disgrace what’s going on.”

Trump’s claims were not the first time he’s said voters cast ballots fraudulently in elections. He claimed the same thing following his election as president and has pushed a narrative about illegal votes since the midterm elections last week, where Democrats took control of the House of Representatives.

The president’s insistence that people change their clothing before voting again (even though there is no evidence of such a thing happening) was quickly mocked online, with many people making comparisons to cartoon characters and superheroes.

While many people made jokes about cartoons, there was even a reference to the New York Mets. In 1999, the team’s then-manager Bobby Valentine was ejected from a game, put on a fake mustache, and went back into the dugout.

Clearly people aren’t buying Trump’s latest idea of illegal voting.

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Andrew Wyrich

Andrew Wyrich

Andrew Wyrich is a politics staff writer for the Daily Dot, covering the intersection of politics and the internet. Andrew has written for USA Today, NorthJersey.com, and other newspapers and websites. His work has been recognized by the Society of the Silurians, Investigative Reporters & Editors (IRE), and the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ).