White House report has a lot of superheroes listed as interns

Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC-BY-SA)

There are some superhero names you may recognize.

The White House released a report compiled by its Council of Economic Advisers that included the names of several comic book and fantasy characters listed as interns.

The 2019 Economic Report of the President was released on Tuesday and included a number of things President Donald Trump will likely highlight in the coming months.

However, buried on page 624 of the report, is a list of a number of “student interns” who provided “help with research projects, day-to-day operations, and fact-checking.”

Some of the names may be very familiar to any comic book fan, or anyone who has watched a superhero movie or Game of Thrones. The names were noticed on Twitter by Martha Gimbel.

The Council played the names off as a joke on Tuesday evening.

The intern list included:

  • John Snow (misspelled)
  • Bruce Wayne
  • Steve Rogers
  • Peter Parker
  • Aunt May

Economic Report of the President Intern Names Trump whitehouse.gov

There is also John Cleese and Kathryn Janeway of Star Trek. The Daily Dot has reached out to the White House for comment on the names. We’ll update this post if we hear back.

The Council of Economic Advisers addressed the list of names in a tweet on Tuesday afternoon.

“Thank you for noticing, our interns are indeed super heroes! We’ve thought so all along, but we knew it’d take a little more to get them the attention they deserve. They have made significant contributions to the Economic Report of the President and do so every day at CEA,” they wrote on Twitter, adding: “Who said economics has to be a dismal science?”

The Council also insisted that the names were not a mistake.

“Did folks really think this was a mistake?!? That would never have made it past our fact-checkers — who, in fact, include our interns!” they wrote.

Even if they did misspell Jon Snow.

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Andrew Wyrich

Andrew Wyrich

Andrew Wyrich is a politics staff writer for the Daily Dot, covering the intersection of politics and the internet. Andrew has written for USA Today, NorthJersey.com, and other newspapers and websites. His work has been recognized by the Society of the Silurians, Investigative Reporters & Editors (IRE), and the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ).