Trump’s first veto comes in a tweet, and there are memes

Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC-BY-SA)

We all knew this was going to happen.

President Donald Trump announced what is expected to be his first presidential veto in a tweet.

The president made clear Thursday afternoon that he would veto a Congressional measure that rebuked his declaration of a national emergency at the country’s southern border with a simple, one word, tweet.

“VETO!” he wrote shortly after 2pm CT on Thursday.

The tweet came after the Senate voted 59 to 41—with several Republicans joining Democrats—to block the emergency declaration. The vote tally shows, however, that they do not have enough votes to override the promised veto from the president.

Trump announced in mid-February that he would declare a national emergency as a mechanism to get his long-desired wall along the country’s southern border.

The president had signaled his intentions in a number of tweets over the past several days.

“Prominent legal scholars agree that our actions to address the National Emergency at the Southern Border and to protect the American people are both CONSTITUTIONAL and EXPRESSLY authorized by Congress….” he wrote in a series of tweets earlier on Thursday. “….If, at a later date, Congress wants to update the law, I will support those efforts, but today’s issue is BORDER SECURITY and Crime!!! Don’t vote with Pelosi!”

He added:

“A vote for today’s resolution by Republican Senators is a vote for Nancy Pelosi, Crime, and the Open Border Democrats!”

He also retweeted an official White House tweet that said “this is a national emergency” with a video of undocumented immigrants crossing the border and on Wednesday said that Republicans were “overthinking” the vote.

However, the president’s one-word “veto” tweet also caught the attention of Twitter, which quickly joked about it.

Trump has 10 days to officially declare a veto. Unless he thinks this counts.

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Andrew Wyrich

Andrew Wyrich

Andrew Wyrich is a politics staff writer for the Daily Dot, covering the intersection of politics and the internet. Andrew has written for USA Today, NorthJersey.com, and other newspapers and websites. His work has been recognized by the Society of the Silurians, Investigative Reporters & Editors (IRE), and the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ).