Screengrab via TheWhiteHouse/YouTube

The praise for himself was quick.

President Donald Trump on Monday praised a building branded with his name during the opening moments of his remarks at the United Nations before calling for reforms to the international body.

“I actually saw great potential right across the street, to be honest with you, and it was only for the reason that the United Nations was here that that turned out to be such a successful project,” the president said shortly after starting his speech. 

Trump World Tower is across the street from the United Nations headquarters on 1st Avenue in Manhattan. It is a residential building completed in 2001.

The building has been the home of former New York Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter and current Trump adviser Kellyanne Conway. Saudi Arabia owns the 45th floor of the tower, according to USA Today.

Trump addressed members of the United Nations on Monday and is expected to address the full assembly on Tuesday. During his speech, Trump criticized the “bureaucracy and mismanagement” within the international governing body, adding that it has yet to reach its “full potential.” He also called for the protection of whistleblowers.

“We seek a United Nations that regains the trust of the people around the world,” Trump said. “In order to achieve this, the United Nations must hold every level of management accountable, protect whistleblowers, and focus on results rather than on process.”

The president said he supported reform at the U.N.

Before addressing the United Nations, Trump also had a bit of trouble with the microphone. Shortly before speaking, Trump asked U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres about how to turn his mic on and off. While attempting to turn it off, Trump inadvertently turned it on, broadcasting his question to Guterres.

“Does red mean it’s on, or it’s off?” he said.

Andrew Wyrich

Andrew Wyrich

Andrew Wyrich is a politics staff writer for the Daily Dot, covering the intersection of politics and the internet. Andrew has written for USA Today, NorthJersey.com, and other newspapers and websites. His work has been recognized by the Society of the Silurians, Investigative Reporters & Editors (IRE), and the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ).