Fire in Trump Tower sparks conspiracy theories, jokes

@constanandy/Twitter (Fair Use) William Warby/Flickr (CC-BY)

Some people are convinced the fire was set intentionally.

A small fire broke out on the roof of Trump Tower in New York on Monday morning, according to numerous reports.

The fire caused smoke to be seen billowing from the roof of the skyscraper, which is home to President Donald Trump‘s luxury apartment.

Two people suffered injuries as a result of the fire, which the New York Daily News reports appeared to break out in the building’s heating and cooling system.

Trump was in Washington D.C. at the time of the fire.

The president’s son, Eric Trump, praised first responders for their work battling the fire.

“There was a small electrical fire in a cooling tower on the roof of Trump Tower,” he wrote on Monday morning. “The New York Fire Department was here within minutes and did an incredible job. The men and women of the are true heroes and deserve our most sincere thanks and praise!”

While the fire was relatively small and did not spread, it did not stop conspiracy theories from cropping up online.

At least one page on Facebook already began spreading rumors that the president may have died in the fire.

The page, Neon Nettle, posted that it had “sources” that told them it was a “deep state assassination attempt.”

A fire broke out at Trump Tower in New York on Monday. It sparked conspiracy theories and jokes. Neon Nettle/Flickr

A fire broke out at Trump Tower in New York on Monday. It sparked conspiracy theories and jokes. Neon Nettle/Facebook

But they weren’t alone. Other people thought the fire must have been nefarious in nature.

https://twitter.com/GodElectedTrump/status/950368213442990080

Other people thought the fire was an opportunity to crack a joke.

The fire comes less than a week after a fire at Hillary Clinton’s house became fodder for conspiracy theories as well.

Andrew Wyrich

Andrew Wyrich

Andrew Wyrich is a politics staff writer for the Daily Dot, covering the intersection of politics and the internet. Andrew has written for USA Today, NorthJersey.com, and other newspapers and websites. His work has been recognized by the Society of the Silurians, Investigative Reporters & Editors (IRE), and the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ).