Petition to kick Scotland out of the U.K. arrives as Brexit tensions simmer

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Union Jack without Scotland

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Scottish independence activists loved the idea.

A controversial online petition calling for Scotland to be thrown out of the United Kingdom has been launched in England and has already attracted over 8,000 signatures.

The petition calls for a parliamentary debate on what Scotland brings to the Union “financially and socially,” followed by an English-only referendum on whether to kick Scotland out—seemingly the people of Wales and Northern Ireland will not get a say.

The divisive sentiment comes to surface as British Prime Minister Theresa May attempts to pull together plans for U.K.’s exit from the European Union. Expectations across all four corners of the U.K. are running high, as each country hopes to secure the best Brexit deal.

Back in June the U.K. was split on the E.U., as people in Scotland and Northern Ireland voted to remain while those England and Wales voted to leave. Just two years earlier, in 2014, Scotland had voted to stay in the U.K. in what proved to be an extremely close independence referendum.

All this direct democracy seems has left the 300-year-old Union a little tender.

The petition, allegedly originating with readers of British right-wing newspaper the Daily Mail, argues that “despite being part of the union the ramification of Scotland remaining in has not been explained or explored for English people.”

Online, however, the proposal was met with trolling, sarcasm, and backlash when Scottish Twitter users hijacked the petition’s hashtag #ThrowScotlandOut to hilarious effect.

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But pro-independence Scots, who have been campaigning for an #Indyref2 since the outcome of Brexit, just can’t believe their luck…

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