Majority of Americans think Trump’s tweets are bad for the country

Most Americans want President Donald Trump to stop tweeting, according to a new poll which addressed public opinion on his frequent use of the social media website.

The poll, conducted by POLITICO/Morning Consult, revealed that 69 percent of participants think that Trump tweets too much and that 51 percent believe that it hurts national security. A majority of 57 percent think that his tweets are hurting his presidency, while 53 percent complain it negatively impacts the United States’ standing in the world.

Only 23 percent of participants said that Trump’s use of Twitter is “a good thing,” with Republicans slightly more inclined to take this view, 41 percent to 37 percent.

Even before winning the presidency, Trump was a prolific Twitter user and boasts almost 32 million followers.

Despite inheriting the official @POTUS account, used by his predecessor, Trump still uses his personal account, @realDonaldTrump, to reflect on current affairs and vent his frustrations. His rants and outbursts often steer the news cycle, guiding conversation because of their uncensored and blunt commentary.

Legal experts, however, have been warning that recent travel ban tweets could have very real consequences in that they may hurt his administration’s defense of it in the Supreme Court.

After Saturday’s terrorist attack in London, the president unleashed a Monday morning tweetstorm calling for the immediate implementation of his immigration executive order that banned travelers from six Muslim-majority countries. In the moment, he clarified explicitly that his executive order was, controversially, a “TRAVEL BAN.”

In response, Trump made clear that he does not plan to give up his account anytime soon. On Tuesday, he took aim at his favorite adversary, the mainstream media, and criticized its alleged efforts to have him delete his accounts.

‘FAKE MSM’ conspiracy aside, the president would do well to pay attention to what the American people think of his Twitter output which, according to the poll, is less than approving.

David Gilmour

David Gilmour

David Gilmour is a reporter who specializes in national politics, internet culture, and technology. He previously covered civil liberties, crime, and politics for Vice.