MENUMENU

Paul Ryan brags in deleted tweet about the GOP tax cut saving a woman $1.50 per week

Kirakirameister/Wikimedia Commons PRyan/Twitter (CC-BY-SA) Remix by Samantha Grasso

That’s not a typo.

While Americans are beginning to see evidence of the Republican tax bill affecting their paychecks, House Speaker Paul Ryan is totally convinced it’s working in the taxpayer’s favor—with this anecdote of a woman being able to afford a $60 Costco membership.

On Friday and Saturday, Ryan shared an article from the Associated Press reporting that Americans are beginning to see more take-home pay as a result of the new tax withholding guidelines.

In the piece, the AP touched on a Florida resident who received $200 more in his last paycheck, along with a few statistics—that Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin estimates 90 percent of workers will see more take-home pay and with the Tax Policy Center estimating an average tax cut of $930 per household.

However, it seems that the story that really got Ryan’s blood pumping over his tax bill success was that of a Pennsylvania high school secretary who was going to see, drum roll please … a whopping $1.50 more in her paycheck per week. Yes, Ryan was enthralled to know he had helped one worker hold onto a hefty $78 a year. Enough to cover her year-long Costco membership, she boasted.

Of course, Ryan couldn’t hold onto the good news himself, tweeting out the AP story with the secretary’s anecdote of how “pleasantly surprised” she was with her paycheck change.

Paul Ryan's tweet bragging about a woman making an extra $1.50 a week because of the tax bill. PRyan/Twitter

Ryan deleted the tweet Saturday afternoon, probably because he got roasted so harshly for patting himself on the back over helping a woman save $78 a year.

The internet reveled in it, wholeheartedly.

Sure, that woman may have gotten much less than the average $930 cut per household, but Ryan’s misguided tweet might just make up for it.

Samantha Grasso

Samantha Grasso

Samantha Grasso is a former IRL staff writer for the Daily Dot with a reporting emphasis on immigration. Her work has appeared on Los Angeles Magazine, Death And Taxes, Revelist, Texts From Last Night, Austin Monthly, and she has previously contributed to Texas Monthly.