Ohio sheriff’s deputy reportedly fired for racist tweets

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Other than his racist remarks, little is known about Zach Davis.

A deputy with the Clark County Sheriff’s Office in Ohio has reportedly been fired for a series of racist tweets.

According to WHIO-TV, Deputy Zach Davis was terminated after his superiors were alerted to several of his tweets referencing the protests and riots in Baltimore following the death of Freddie Gray.

“It’s time to start using deadly force in Baltimore,” Davis wrote in one tweet. “When they start slaying these ignorant young people it’ll send a message.”

Twitter

A portion of the email sent to the Clark County Sheriff’s Office, and other law enforcement agencies, was published by WHIO-TV:

“…everyone is entitled to his or her opinion, but not everyone is entitled to express the level of insensitivity, hostility, and maliciousness that is evident in the following tweets — especially when the person expressing them holds the responsibility of enforcing the law, when that person indeed holds the power of the state in his hands.”

Twitter

Twitter

At present, little is known about Davis, other than what is inferred from the tweets above. In his bio he claims that he’s “just about that action boss,” and makes references to the Bible.

He also writes in his bio that he’d “rather be judged by 12 than carried by 6,” a phrase that means someone would rather be judged by 12 jurors than carried dead in a casket by six pallbearers. 

In addition to being the title of a famous hip-hop track, the saying has also been used by U.S. soldiers. Essentially, it means they’d rather shoot people and face a court martial than risk being shot themselves. 

H/T WHIO-TV | Photo via Elvert Barnes/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Dell Cameron

Dell Cameron

Dell Cameron was a reporter at the Daily Dot who covered security and politics. In 2015, he revealed the existence of an American hacker on the U.S. government's terrorist watchlist. He is a co-author of the Sabu Files, an award-nominated investigation into the FBI's use of cyber-informants. He became a staff writer at Gizmodo in 2017.